Generators in the rain. (My case: Honda eu3000is)

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Re: Generators in the rain. (My case: Honda eu3000is)

Postby Fiver » Fri Oct 26, 2012 5:20 pm

Elliot wrote:I should add, for short term storage:
With the EU-3000, you can run the carbonator dry by shutting off the manual fuel valve. That valve is there for a reason.
You can apparently accomplish the same with the EU-1000 by shutting off the vent on the fuel tank cap. Seems to serve the same function, only in a different way.
:D



I was going to ask about this actually. What's better for putting it to bed for the winter. Some people say change the oil, drain the tank (and carb) and keep it in a dry place. Others just say change the oil as you would normally, but fill the tank up all the way. Then over the winter just fire up the Genny every month or so and let it run (with eco mode off) for 15-20 minutes.
Drain it, or run it every so often....Opinions? I don't plan on really using it again until spring/summer.
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Re: Generators in the rain. (My case: Honda eu3000is)

Postby gyre » Fri Oct 26, 2012 7:44 pm

If you don't want to keep it in play for use, I'd say dry of fuel.
For longer term storage, some people spray oil on the rings, etc.
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Re: Generators in the rain. (My case: Honda eu3000is)

Postby Elliot » Fri Oct 26, 2012 8:19 pm

The problem with storing the unit with gasoline in it, is that gasoline "goes bad" with time. Gasoline, like most substances in common use, consists of a number of distinct components. You are familiar with this phenomenon, because there are some bottles and jars that you have to shake or stir before use, because the components separate during storage. Such as orange juice. Gasoline does not separate in a visible way, but the most volatile components, know as the "light ends" (if I remember right), evaporate. This is the part of the gasoline that turns to fumes most easily, and this is vital to get a cold engine started. Think of the light ends of the gasoline as the kindling for a wood fire.

And think of the many times you have seen a neighbor try to start a lawn mower first time in spring -- pulling on the cord a million times to no avail, cleaning the wet spark plug over and over. We say that the old gasoline is stale. This happened to a neighbor of mine some years ago. When I realized what was going on, I walked over and told him to go to the filling station for fresh gasoline. I could tell by the look on his face that he did not entirely believe me, but maybe he wanted to be polite -- he went for fresh gasoline. Moments after he returned I heard his mower start.

You can still use the stale gasoline so long as the engine is warm, or you mix it with fresh gasoline. (I've been known to use many-years-old gasoline salvaged from junk boats. I'll pour two or three gallons into my half-full car tank.)

Now, I mentioned fuel stabilizing additives like Sta-Bil. This product reduces that evaporation of the "kindling". This certainly helps. But for a year's storage, I drain it completely, and I put Sta-Bil in the last of the gasoline since there is probably some left that does not get burned.

So what's this "gum" problem? Well, I know less about that, but I assume that's the solids that are left of the gasoline after all the liquids evaporate. Nasty stuff, for sure. So leave as little gasoline in there as you possibly can.

Then store the unit in a dry place, and minimize temperature swings. A basement (if it is dry) is better than a detached garage. You want to avoid condensation in the tank. Condensation -- moisture -- will corrode the tank and the carbonator. That's why some folks say to fill the tank full -- it will minimize condensation. But then you may have to drain that gasoline, and you may have more gunk than necessary.

Starting the generator every so often does not make sense to me. But I have heard reasonable-sounding arguments for that too. ("There are no answers, only choices.")

:D
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Re: Generators in the rain. (My case: Honda eu3000is)

Postby gyre » Fri Oct 26, 2012 8:36 pm

Gas has always had some stability problems, but the ethanol tax and the other garbage they are putting in is much worse.
A friend tried to mix older gas and was unable to use any quantity.
Even my van with carb wouldn't run well on a partial mix of some slightly older gas.

Once I had some month old gas in a car I was working on.
Wouldn't start.
Added just a little and it ran.
Just lost enough volatiles.
That fast!

Lobby against ethanol.
Repeal the tax.

It's funny.
People will vote down a one cent tax increase, but they allow this 35% ethanol tax every time they buy gas.
And that's not counting the other support for corn.
I think it's very bad for engines too.
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Re: Generators in the rain. (My case: Honda eu3000is)

Postby Rice » Sat Oct 27, 2012 10:43 am

I agree with the concept of emptying the fuel tank. Up here we have fairly dramatic temperature fluctuations (from 90+F to -40F). My BM regional rep has a generator and it has had many issues caused by old fuel. So, every fall (before the snow comes) we empty the fuel tank & clean it (plus doing basic engine maintenance) and store it in her shed. In the spring we add some new gas and bazam - it runs fine. When we fail to empty the fuel, it has issues... I suspect that our temperature fluctuations may be a contributing factor. ??
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Re: Generators in the rain. (My case: Honda eu3000is)

Postby Elliot » Sat Oct 27, 2012 10:55 am

Temperature fluctuations could cause accumulation of moisture, if the cap does not seal completely. Apparently, you have no problem with this. Sounds like what you have observed is the basic stale fuel problem. But take a look inside the tank with a flashlight and look for rust, which could become a major problem in the long run.

Such an expensive -- and wonderful -- item as a Honda EU-series just might rate storage in the house, after every drop of gasoline has been purged and the tank vented with the cap off for a while.
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Re: Generators in the rain. (My case: Honda eu3000is)

Postby unjonharley » Sat Oct 27, 2012 12:06 pm

Sears has a mower replacement gas cap with a metering additive device..
I bought one after the lawn mower started to act up.. It's designed to counter the corn water the government added to our gasoline.. Worked very well. Now I have one for the sweeper,blower and chipper. Don't thing one is needed for the string clipper or chain saw. The oil in the gas should take care of that.. Had to have the gas tank removed and cleaned on the mulcher/thatcher. The watery corn go's the bottom and rust it out inside.. I will buy another metering gas cap for it.
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Re: Generators in the rain. (My case: Honda eu3000is)

Postby dragonpilot » Mon Oct 29, 2012 2:18 pm

Here in the Pac Northwest we're subject to winter power outages. My house is rigged for a portable generator. Most survivalists and preppers advise running the gen once a month for 15 minutes or so to keep internals lubed and also to know ahead of time if it's gonna start or not. If it doesn't start you'll have time to get her fixed before you really need it.

Since I only plan to use the gen for power outages, that means it's gonna sit for long periods, so I prep it for long term storage...add gas when I do test runs. Also gotta keep a supply of gas at the ready (as well as oil)...I add Regular Sta-Bil to my jerry cans...supposed to give it a 12-month storage period, according to company literature.
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Re: Generators in the rain. (My case: Honda eu3000is)

Postby gyre » Mon Oct 29, 2012 4:26 pm

You can buy ethanol free gas, ie real gas, in some places.
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Re: Generators in the rain. (My case: Honda eu3000is)

Postby Sham » Mon Oct 29, 2012 4:32 pm

I am typing this while online with generator power during hurricane Sandy. The generator has been running for two hours now in a driving, torrential rain. No problems running the entire time with no flickering whatsoever.
I'm going out soon to check the gas, and will make sure that everything appears to be working well and happy.
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Re: Generators in the rain. (My case: Honda eu3000is)

Postby unjonharley » Mon Oct 29, 2012 4:33 pm

gyre wrote:You can buy ethanol free gas, ie real gas, in some places.



Wounder about (small) Salem airport.. I want to store a little gas for power outages.
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Re: Generators in the rain. (My case: Honda eu3000is)

Postby Rice » Mon Oct 29, 2012 4:33 pm

Shambala wrote:I am typing this while online with generator power during hurricane Sandy. The generator has been running for two hours now in a driving, torrential rain. No problems running the entire time with no flickering whatsoever.
I'm going out soon to check the gas, and will make sure that everything appears to be working well and happy.

Keep safe!! -
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Re: Generators in the rain. (My case: Honda eu3000is)

Postby gyre » Mon Oct 29, 2012 5:48 pm

Shambala wrote:I am typing this while online with generator power during hurricane Sandy. The generator has been running for two hours now in a driving, torrential rain. No problems running the entire time with no flickering whatsoever.
I'm going out soon to check the gas, and will make sure that everything appears to be working well and happy.

So, no power, but the internet junctions without power are magically working?

Have you looked outside?
Does it look like this?

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Re: Generators in the rain. (My case: Honda eu3000is)

Postby Foxfur » Fri Nov 16, 2012 12:30 pm

I know I'm gonna get lotsa flames on this...

I guess I break all the rules.
We live deep in the forest where our power goes out within the first few snowflakes and shortly after severe rainstorms begin.
The generators live outside, uncovered, year round. Sun of summer, rain and snow of fall and winter, and the ennui of spring.
Don't use sta-bil, never drain the tank, and always forget to run it for a half hour per week during the off-season.
Refill it without the recommended cooldown period.
Generally store the fuel within a few feet of it.
Use it in the pouring rain and sometimes have it running with a foot of snow on top. You wouldn't think snow would stick with all the vibration but it will when it's snowing hard enough...
When generating season is almost upon us I'll tilt it slightly to move accumulated water to the tank outlet, drop the fuel line from the carb, drain the tank water. Also pull the drain screw from the bowl to get the water out.
It always starts on the second pull.
Don't use a transfer switch.
Have a 4-pole (both sides of 240V, neutral, ground) suicide cord that backfeeds through a 2-pole, 50-amp breaker that used to be for our hot tub.
Used to buy fuel from the Hussein regime under the oil-for-food-program with funds intended for charity but now use a locally operated Al Queda fuel supplier.
Forgo usage of the electric starter in favor of imported child labor pull-starts.

Now I'm not saying that you should do it wrong as above.
I guess I'm trying to say that you can be stupid and still git 'er done.
Keep it fatal and all that.

On-playa genny? Since you have a Honda, you obviously are a conscientious neighbor, willing to spend a few more bucks on reliability and low noise operation, I'd say you're doing it right.
Bring an extra air filter and rock on.
I wouldn't dream of taking our 10,000-watt Generac out there but have run my Honda EU2000ied for extended periods. Being me, I didn't take a spare filter but no ill came of it. Granted, it was 2011 and the lack of dust was completely absurd.
I ran mine less than 5 feet from my trailer and had a neighboring camp's Honda right beside it.
I never had a problem sleeping.
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Re: Generators in the rain. (My case: Honda eu3000is)

Postby MacGlenver » Fri Nov 16, 2012 12:50 pm

Foxfur wrote:I know I'm gonna get lotsa flames on this...

I guess I break all the rules.
We live deep in the forest where our power goes out within the first few snowflakes and shortly after severe rainstorms begin.
The generators live outside, uncovered, year round. Sun of summer, rain and snow of fall and winter, and the ennui of spring.
Don't use sta-bil, never drain the tank, and always forget to run it for a half hour per week during the off-season.
Refill it without the recommended cooldown period.
Generally store the fuel within a few feet of it.
Use it in the pouring rain and sometimes have it running with a foot of snow on top. You wouldn't think snow would stick with all the vibration but it will when it's snowing hard enough...
When generating season is almost upon us I'll tilt it slightly to move accumulated water to the tank outlet, drop the fuel line from the carb, drain the tank water. Also pull the drain screw from the bowl to get the water out.
It always starts on the second pull.
Don't use a transfer switch.
Have a 4-pole (both sides of 240V, neutral, ground) suicide cord that backfeeds through a 2-pole, 50-amp breaker that used to be for our hot tub.
Used to buy fuel from the Hussein regime under the oil-for-food-program with funds intended for charity but now use a locally operated Al Queda fuel supplier.
Forgo usage of the electric starter in favor of imported child labor pull-starts.


Love you even more for having said this :)

Dont own a genny myself, but at our local burn (Euphoria) we rented a 2000watt Honda and it ran great in the pouring rain.
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