Kitchen Basics

What do you eat and drink on the playa? Share ideas, recipes and advice here.

Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby maryanimal » Wed Dec 28, 2011 10:02 pm

I agree with you Elloreum! Small is great! I have two of the camping cookware sets. (everything fits inside each other), a small 8" teflon fry pan, a 10 qt. stock pot! I bring a few basic kitchen utensils and I'm set! I'll actually be bringing less cooking gear next year. Being a burgin this year, I learned alot about what not to bring!
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby bigdane » Sat Jan 07, 2012 8:32 pm

schnikey there is a ton of good info here!!! illy dilly - kick butt with that list! TT120 and JK good tips too! really all this plus the survival guide...who would think one could forget anything....though I bet it happens l&r!!
I wonder though...my first burn this year and planning to camp in a theme camp (TBD)...of course I don't have a ticket yet...but when I do (cuz I will) does anyone know if most of the camps coordinate who brings what or is the expectation that everyone bring there own kitchen supplies, cookware, stove..etc...

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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby theCryptofishist » Sat Jan 07, 2012 8:41 pm

It depends on the camp. If someone else brings the kitchen, treat them as gods/goddesses, and put in a lot of clean up. One thing to think about it--are you joining a camp to get fed, or are you joining a camp because you love what they are doing?
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby bigdane » Sat Jan 07, 2012 10:10 pm

theCryptofishist wrote:One thing to think about it--are you joining a camp to get fed, or are you joining a camp because you love what they are doing?


good point Fishy....mostly because of what they are doing...like minds think enough alike that they can camp together for a week...I just don't want to be too presumptuous about what is available for camp use and also don't want to buy more than I may need and then give away when I fly back home...I guess more will become clear on this over the next several months....
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby theCryptofishist » Sat Jan 07, 2012 11:03 pm

I realize that flying out means that you have to do mondo shopping in Reno, and then not take it home, or you just don't get to have everything that you think you need. But if you can get by on peanut butter and crackers (and I almost can) then you're better off by yourself than with a camp of unfriendly people who expect you to wait on them.

Of course, these are not the only two possible choices.
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby Oldguy » Tue Jan 17, 2012 5:35 pm

Just recieved my replacement regulator tube from the Coleman Company today. I bought a propane stove at Goodwill but it was missing the fill tube. Only took 2 days by Fedex. I ordered the part over the web.

I hooked up the tube to my 2 burner stove, hooked a 1 pound can of propane to the other end and lit up my stove. Works perfectly. It might be a good time to test and clean your basic cooking stuff now also.

I'm thinking about getting a bulk tank, tree, and adapters, and hoses. 1 pound cans can't be refilled but tanks can... economy of scale thing. My small butane backpackers stove is fine for boiling water and heating a canteen cup of coffee, but just doesn't do it for a full meal. This year I'll find out how much better a 2 burner stove is. With 1 pound cans of propane.
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby CornMan » Tue Jan 17, 2012 9:21 pm

If there are only men in the camp, you can do (and not do) whatever you damn well please. If there are women in the camp, you have to take things into consideration. This is especially true when camping away from the playa. For instance, if you are camping in the mountains or the beach, and if there are women camping with you, it is generally considered not kosher to have the dogs do the preliminary cleaning of the dishes.
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby CornMan » Tue Jan 17, 2012 11:08 pm

[edit to the above]
I can't speak for the gay camps with men only. They might get fussy to about things. I don't know.
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby Thorormr » Mon Feb 06, 2012 5:46 pm

Oldguy wrote:Just recieved my replacement regulator tube from the Coleman Company today. I bought a propane stove at Goodwill but it was missing the fill tube. Only took 2 days by Fedex. I ordered the part over the web.

I hooked up the tube to my 2 burner stove, hooked a 1 pound can of propane to the other end and lit up my stove. Works perfectly. It might be a good time to test and clean your basic cooking stuff now also.

I'm thinking about getting a bulk tank, tree, and adapters, and hoses. 1 pound cans can't be refilled but tanks can... economy of scale thing. My small butane backpackers stove is fine for boiling water and heating a canteen cup of coffee, but just doesn't do it for a full meal. This year I'll find out how much better a 2 burner stove is. With 1 pound cans of propane.


I've lived with my two burner coleman propane for years now. A one pound tank lasts a long while so long as the valves and tank connections are not leaking. You can get bulk tank adapters, hoses and all manner of doo-dads. I was looking at getting one of the roll up camp kitchens from Cabela's for a while, and the Camp Chef oven. (Yes, I'm a camp cook) IMHO, you won't need to go with the bulk setup unless you are actually cooking three squares a day for a group. (And in those cases you've also got the wrong stove for the job) If you're just making coffee and hot water for dehydrated meals or other quick things like eggs and pancakes most likely you'll only need two pounds at most for a week. Probably only one. Maul Mart sells two packs for a little less than $6. Now, if you wanted to run a full blown setup, stove, gas oven, etc. now the 20lb tank, clamp on tree, lantern on top, connector hoses to both stove and oven becomes a very worthwhile thing. I have hanging LED lights that run on AA NiMHs so don't need to pack the evil daystar coleman lantern. I also have a one burner self contained butane stove, and one tank lasts about two hours on full blast, that's enough to boil water for tea and simple meals for a three day weekend. Takes up a lot less space, but it's totally useless once the temperature drops below about 35F or so as butane stays liquid at atmosphere.

Another tip, if you do wind up cooking for a small crowd on spur of the moment is to pack a tabletop propane grill. I keep metal skewers in the kit, you can put all kinds of things on a stick, sear it and call it food, less time consumed in food prep that way too. Try putting an entire pack of hot dogs or sausages on two skewers crosswise through the ends like a ladder. And counter-intuitive, but a non-stick aluminum stove top griddle is light (Nordic Ware or Lodge if you want cast iron) and if you take out the heat deflector in the grill, you can make a dozen pancakes at a time on the flat side, or a pound of bacon. That way too, the grease spatter would be on the grill. You can't close the lid to snuff a grease fire with the griddle in the way, but at least the grill is intended to survive it. Just don't use non-stick spray on it, use oil on a folded paper towel, the lecithin in non-stick spray makes sticky spots that are hard to clean off.
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby EspressoDude » Tue Feb 07, 2012 5:34 pm

to minimize wasting water and creating excess grey water to dispose of we use fresh water for the sanitizing and rinsing. The wash water is the previous meals is rinse and sanitizing water poured into the wash basin and a bit of soap added. The dirty water used for washing is poured into an empty jug for disposal at home, or at a campground waste water dump site.

Don't bother mucking around with evap ponds. If you brought water to the playa in a container, use that container to haul it away. This assumes of course that someone does not spike or puncture the containers trying to make them pour better, rendering them useless.
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby shykat » Tue Feb 07, 2012 5:51 pm

EspressoDude wrote:to minimize wasting water and creating excess grey water to dispose of we use fresh water for the sanitizing and rinsing. The wash water is the previous meals is rinse and sanitizing water poured into the wash basin and a bit of soap added. The dirty water used for washing is poured into an empty jug for disposal at home, or at a campground waste water dump site.

Don't bother mucking around with evap ponds. If you brought water to the playa in a container, use that container to haul it away. This assumes of course that someone does not spike or puncture the containers trying to make them pour better, rendering them useless.


Agreed, camp of 6 and we haul out 10 gallons of grey water,most from showers..
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby incubus_pantomime » Tue Feb 07, 2012 5:52 pm

Has anyone had any experience with using a "collapsible kitchen"? Like this:

Image

We have one already that we've used for family camping trips, and I wanted to know if these are successful on the playa. I should mention that this would be under a monkey hut that will (theoretically) have tarp closures on either end to act as "doors," so blowing away in the wind shouldn't be an issue.

Our kitchen doesn't have to be simple, but it has to be able to condense down into "checked baggage" size.
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby hotmess » Wed Feb 08, 2012 4:06 pm

Clorox bleach wipes are great for cleaning up your cooking gear and dishes. No water wasted and totally burnable.
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby Savannah » Wed Feb 08, 2012 4:25 pm

incubus_pantomime wrote:Has anyone had any experience with using a "collapsible kitchen"? Like this:

Image

We have one already that we've used for family camping trips, and I wanted to know if these are successful on the playa. I should mention that this would be under a monkey hut that will (theoretically) have tarp closures on either end to act as "doors," so blowing away in the wind shouldn't be an issue.

Our kitchen doesn't have to be simple, but it has to be able to condense down into "checked baggage" size.


I've seen lots of those out there, and they are unlikely to be especially vulnerable while under a good monkey hut. I've had items that were as light or lighter (camp chairs, folding tables) do fine inside a monkey hut. (Napkins, plates and utensils are much more likely to move, however--creative weighting-down helps). I don't know what brand of kitchen is best, but the folding kitchens are fairly popular . . . so if the online reviews satisfy you and you'd really like one, I'd say do it.

Y'all put me to shame. My kitchen is a Rubbermaid container with paper dishes, plastic utensils, canned ravioli and chili, vacuum-sealed salmon, Indian food, and rice, chillable fruit cups, dried fruit, bread, tortillas, cookies, crackers, Luna bars, sardines, kippers, jerky, cereal, H. Farms shelf-stable milk, peanut butter, jam, honey, picked vegetables (at least three kinds), juice boxes, soda, booze, spices, and vitamins. I heat nothing! :lol:
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby Nipple » Wed Feb 08, 2012 4:29 pm

Savannah wrote:Y'all put me to shame. My kitchen is a Rubbermaid container with paper dishes, plastic utensils, canned ravioli and chili, vacuum-sealed salmon, Indian food, and rice, chillable fruit cups, dried fruit, bread, tortillas, cookies, crackers, Luna bars, sardines, kippers, jerky, cereal, H. Farms shelf-stable milk, peanut butter, jam, honey, picked vegetables (at least three kinds), juice boxes, soda, booze, spices, and vitamins. I heat nothing! :lol:


Having gone with a big kitchen last year and full on meal times, I'm going to be going with Savannah's design down to the luna bars. (Lemonzest4lyf!)

I spent WAY too much time last year cooking and doing dishes, instead of being out and tearing things up. I already didn't see enough last year, the hell I want to spend any time beyond boiling some water.
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby Savannah » Wed Feb 08, 2012 4:34 pm

And it's even (fairly) nutritionally sound, especially if you make sure to eat fruit/fruit juice/V-8 daily, get some chilled milk with cereal at breakfast (frosted mini wheats are excellent complex carbs) maybe a peanut butter or devilled meat sandwich at lunch, and fish at dinner with some rice or triscuits, or the Indian dinner, or let it be Ravioli Time . . . protein is especially good at dinner; you might walk all night, you need it.

The jerky and Luna bars typically ride in my backpack, and I usually have a spare (because it's fun to be the person with an extra snack when someone else is really @#$% hungry).

But don't test me on this, because I may give you a Luna bar flavor you'll regret!
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby Nipple » Wed Feb 08, 2012 5:29 pm

I carried around poptarts for that.

The random pop tart was met with confusion and suspicion.

"What's this?"
"Pop tart."
"What for?"
"Eating."
"ok!"

When I was retelling this to someone back home, I had to explain to them that there are two camps of worry. Some people are worried that I might have put something in the food. Other people are worried that I didn't put something in the food.
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby Savannah » Wed Feb 08, 2012 5:32 pm

:lol:
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby SquirrelHead » Wed Feb 08, 2012 6:06 pm

Savannah wrote:
Y'all put me to shame. My kitchen is a Rubbermaid container with paper dishes, plastic utensils, canned ravioli and chili, vacuum-sealed salmon, Indian food, and rice, chillable fruit cups, dried fruit, bread, tortillas, cookies, crackers, Luna bars, sardines, kippers, jerky, cereal, H. Farms shelf-stable milk, peanut butter, jam, honey, picked vegetables (at least three kinds), juice boxes, soda, booze, spices, and vitamins. I heat nothing! :lol:


I like this idea a lot! It is simple and still has a lot of variety. I will have to add some pre-cooked bacon to the container though. :twisted:
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby incubus_pantomime » Thu Feb 09, 2012 8:06 am

Savannah wrote:I've seen lots of those out there, and they are unlikely to be especially vulnerable while under a good monkey hut. I've had items that were as light or lighter (camp chairs, folding tables) do fine inside a monkey hut. (Napkins, plates and utensils are much more likely to move, however--creative weighting-down helps). I don't know what brand of kitchen is best, but the folding kitchens are fairly popular . . . so if the online reviews satisfy you and you'd really like one, I'd say do it.

Y'all put me to shame. My kitchen is a Rubbermaid container with paper dishes, plastic utensils, canned ravioli and chili, vacuum-sealed salmon, Indian food, and rice, chillable fruit cups, dried fruit, bread, tortillas, cookies, crackers, Luna bars, sardines, kippers, jerky, cereal, H. Farms shelf-stable milk, peanut butter, jam, honey, picked vegetables (at least three kinds), juice boxes, soda, booze, spices, and vitamins. I heat nothing! :lol:


Awesome! That means one less thing I have to spend money on for the playa (that's not happening often these days)!

Savannah, that's a really clever kitchen solution! I'm only taking this so I can have the "counter" and "sink" space for laying out stuff to make breakfast in the morning or to reheat dinners I'll have already cooked, frozen, and put in gallon ziplock baggies. I had weight loss surgery in December, and I have to make sure that I eat a substantial breakfast, so that will be the one meal a day I'll be cooking. I'm probably going to build my breakfast ideas around the bacon jam discussed in another thread:

viewtopic.php?f=276&t=50788

I've made bacon jam in the past that was very similar to that recipe, and I gotta say -- eating that stuff for the first time was so core-shakingly amazing, I thought I may never eat any other form of solid food again. The best part of waking up on the playa will not be Folger's in my cup...it'll be this shit on toast! :D
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby Eldon McMullen » Sun Feb 19, 2012 6:02 pm

I sailed for the last ten years. you learn all the tricks on how to handle water when its very scarce and may be days till you get close to any that's fresh, other than what you have with you. To purify water that may be contaminated. you only need 1 ounce of bleach for 10 gallons of water. The smell will go away in a few hours. If you are really desperate you can save the water you cook in to wash your utinsles and then make soup out of it for your next meal. Salt water is not good to cook Macaroni in, as it leaves to much salt in the noodles. Mayonnaise will last for months unrefrigerated If you never stick a dirty spoon in the bottle Or better yet use mayonnaise from a squeeze bottle. Peanut butter is good for a long time unrefrigerated also jams. If you dont have Ice drop a couple of stainless nuts in your drink the sound makes them feel like they have ice. Joy is the best soap for camping as its biodegradable and can be used as shampoo, It also sudses in salt water. Mac
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby theCryptofishist » Fri Feb 24, 2012 11:02 pm

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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby BBadger » Sat Feb 25, 2012 9:30 am

hotmess wrote:Clorox bleach wipes are great for cleaning up your cooking gear and dishes. No water wasted and totally burnable.


NO.

This is bad information and is liable to get you and your camp sick.

Bleach is a sanitizing solution. It kills germs, but does not clean your dishes. Bleach will not, for example, remove oil or dirt from your dishes. Killing germs alone can leave the germ-residue on your dishes, providing food for other germs once the bleach is gone. Sanitizing is only good after you've cleaned the surface.

Just because you "wiped" the surface with that Clorox bleach wipe doesn't mean you actually removed the material on there. You need to clean your dishes, which requires using detergent (soap), very hot water, or both. The detergent facilitates the removal of materials from your dishes. Sanitize the dishes afterwards with the wipes if you feel the need to ensure nothing returns.

I recall I believe AntiM talking about some camp n00bs thinking Clorox wipes were enough to "clean" the dishes, and got the whole camp sick. Don't risk your burn, or your camp's burn, by getting lazy about doing the dishes properly.
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby Trishntek » Sat Feb 25, 2012 10:33 am

Agree with ya Badger. Basic food handling requires cleaning, rinsing and sanitizing. You cannot do all three in one step.

When it comes to sanitizing, it is better to allow the bleach water (now there are also hydrogen peroxide wipes and aluminum chloride wipes as alternatives) to air dry. DWELL TIME determines the kinds and quantity of bugs killed. If you dry the SANITIZING fluid off the surface, you may contaminate it more than just letting it dry.

We use spray bottles throughout our camp. Some have bleach water, some have alcohol and some have white vinegar water in them. We use bleach water for surface sanitizing. The alcohol is used for sanitizing our various machinations of pleasure, quick wash for hands and cleaning electronics. The vinegar water neutralizes playa alkalinity and cleans anything dusty.

Garden sprayers work quite nicely for rinsing just about anything with fresh water. They make great squirt guns during the afternoon heat too.
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby BBadger » Sat Feb 25, 2012 10:55 am

Another sanitizing liquid to use is Star San. It's usually for beer making, but good for other things too. You can spray it on surfaces and so long as the surface is wet from the sanitizer for longer than a minute it is left sanitized. Furthermore, Star San leaves a tasteless, harmless (to you), acid-based sanitizing residue that prevents germs from contaminating the surface afterwards.

That single bottle will last you forever, as you dilute it down to one ounce per five gallons; that bottle contains 32oz. The easiest way to sanitize is to put it in a squirt bottle and spray your dishes after they're clean. Don't even bother wiping (and why bother anyway since it is already clean). Remember to not spray your hands unless you want them dried out.
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby Trishntek » Sat Feb 25, 2012 11:03 am

BBadger wrote:Another sanitizing liquid to use is Star San. It's usually for beer making, but good for other things too. You can spray it on surfaces and so long as the surface is wet from the sanitizer for longer than a minute it is left sanitized. Furthermore, Star San leaves a tasteless, harmless (to you), acid-based sanitizing residue that prevents germs from contaminating the surface afterwards.

That single bottle will last you forever, as you dilute it down to one ounce per five gallons; that bottle contains 32oz. The easiest way to sanitize is to put it in a squirt bottle and spray your dishes after they're clean. Don't even bother wiping (and why bother anyway since it is already clean). Remember to not spray your hands unless you want them dried out.


That is why we keep TONS of aloe vera gel and cocoa butter lotion around. I consider it essential to lotion hands AND FEET at least once a day while on the playa.
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby Elorrum » Sat Feb 25, 2012 11:52 am

It's wise to have no cook food options. Weather can make cooking nigh impossible if you don't have a windproof situation.
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby StevenGoodman » Mon Feb 27, 2012 2:02 pm

I always like to have lunch meat, cheese, mustard and tortillas around for quick easy wraps.

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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby Mojojita » Tue Feb 28, 2012 12:28 pm

Anybody cooking food or using propane at all should bring a fire extinguisher - we had to use one twice a couple of years ago although had never needed one before. We had a propane line malfunction spewing flame and also had someone put the barbecue too close to the side of the shade structure - melted about a 1 foot wide hole in it.
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Re: Kitchen Basics

Postby Savannah » Tue Feb 28, 2012 3:17 pm

Excellent advice. One of the best pics at the top of a favorite Burn camp's website depicts a small, unintentional fire in an outdoor grill, and one of the camp leaders holding a fire extinguisher up to the light to double-check instructions for use. :lol:

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