The Rite of Passenger Pidgeons

Postby ygmir » Sat Oct 16, 2010 5:46 pm

unjonharley wrote:
theCryptofishist wrote:
Eric wrote:
Elorrum wrote:It just occurred to me that I wasn't sure how the native Americans would catch and eat these pigeons.


There are actually reports from early settlers (post-contact, obviously) on how the Native Americans in the New York area did it. I don't have the book near me so I can't give you the details. I seem to remember it involved nets (speculation on my part since I don't have the references at hand)- but this is after the pigeon population had boomed due to the aforementioned population loss.

I would guess nets as well. I read a book about early man which suggested that net hunting including the entire tribe was probably a very common way of gathering protein pre-neolithic revolution. Nets just don't survive a few thousand years in the ground as readily as spearheads. I can remember sometime in the past couple dozen years reading about
the French tradition of capturing birds with nets for food, while the birds were migrating between Europe and Africa (and what effect that was having on the population of said birds.)
They could also have eaten the eggs.
And small bird bones might or might not survive in midden heaps; soil chemistry would be just one factor.



The native Am. also use a trap.. Simple, dig a tunnel at a few degrees and bait it.. Birds can not walk backwards.


so, they didn't use a burlap sack, with a candle in the back, for them to "walk towards the light"?
and, I didn't really participate, in an ancient american ritual, waiting in the dark, except, using a flashlight instead of candle?
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Postby unjonharley » Sat Oct 16, 2010 6:11 pm

ygmir wrote:
unjonharley wrote:
theCryptofishist wrote:
Eric wrote:
Elorrum wrote:It just occurred to me that I wasn't sure how the native Americans would catch and eat these pigeons.


There are actually reports from early settlers (post-contact, obviously) on how the Native Americans in the New York area did it. I don't have the book near me so I can't give you the details. I seem to remember it involved nets (speculation on my part since I don't have the references at hand)- but this is after the pigeon population had boomed due to the aforementioned population loss.

I would guess nets as well. I read a book about early man which suggested that net hunting including the entire tribe was probably a very common way of gathering protein pre-neolithic revolution. Nets just don't survive a few thousand years in the ground as readily as spearheads. I can remember sometime in the past couple dozen years reading about
the French tradition of capturing birds with nets for food, while the birds were migrating between Europe and Africa (and what effect that was having on the population of said birds.)
They could also have eaten the eggs.













And small bird bones might or might not survive in midden heaps; soil chemistry would be just one factor.



The native Am. also use a trap.. Simple, dig a tunnel at a few degrees and bait it.. Birds can not walk backwards.


so, they didn't use a burlap sack, with a candle in the back, for them to "walk towards the light"?
and, I didn't really participate, in an ancient american ritual, waiting in the
dark, except, using a flashlight instead of candle?


Flashlight??? Most birds sleep at nite.. Tunnel get smaller to the other end..

Did someone take you snip hunting :?: :P :roll:
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Postby ygmir » Sat Oct 16, 2010 6:30 pm

unjonharley wrote:
ygmir wrote:
unjonharley wrote:
theCryptofishist wrote:
Eric wrote:
Elorrum wrote:It just occurred to me that I wasn't sure how the native Americans would catch and eat these pigeons.


There are actually reports from early settlers (post-contact, obviously) on how the Native Americans in the New York area did it. I don't have the book near me so I can't give you the details. I seem to remember it involved nets (speculation on my part since I don't have the references at hand)- but this is after the pigeon population had boomed due to the aforementioned population loss.

I would guess nets as well. I read a book about early man which suggested that net hunting including the entire tribe was probably a very common way of gathering protein pre-neolithic revolution. Nets just don't survive a few thousand years in the ground as readily as spearheads. I can remember sometime in the past couple dozen years reading about
the French tradition of capturing birds with nets for food, while the birds were migrating between Europe and Africa (and what effect that was having on the population of said birds.)
They could also have eaten the eggs.













And small bird bones might or might not survive in midden heaps; soil chemistry would be just one factor.



The native Am. also use a trap.. Simple, dig a tunnel at a few degrees and bait it.. Birds can not walk backwards.


so, they didn't use a burlap sack, with a candle in the back, for them to "walk towards the light"?
and, I didn't really participate, in an ancient american ritual, waiting in the
dark, except, using a flashlight instead of candle?


Flashlight??? Most birds sleep at nite.. Tunnel get smaller to the other end..

Did someone take you snip hunting :?: :P :roll:


well, yeah, they said it was a tradition.......it's how they did it in the "long ago"..........I waited all dang night for a bird to walk towards the light in the back of the sack....knowing, they can't walk backwards.........

I never did understand why they said my clothing scent would alert the birds, and, so made me wait there naked.

dang it was cold.
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Postby Elorrum » Sat Oct 16, 2010 7:20 pm

ygmir wrote:
unjonharley wrote:
ygmir wrote:
unjonharley wrote:
theCryptofishist wrote:
Eric wrote:
Elorrum wrote:It just occurred to me that I wasn't sure how the native Americans would catch and eat these pigeons.


There are actually reports from early settlers (post-contact, obviously) on how the Native Americans in the New York area did it. I don't have the book near me so I can't give you the details. I seem to remember it involved nets (speculation on my part since I don't have the references at hand)- but this is after the pigeon population had boomed due to the aforementioned population loss.

I would guess nets as well. I read a book about early man which suggested that net hunting including the entire tribe was probably a very common way of gathering protein pre-neolithic revolution. Nets just don't survive a few thousand years in the ground as readily as spearheads. I can remember sometime in the past couple dozen years reading about
the French tradition of capturing birds with nets for food, while the birds were migrating between Europe and Africa (and what effect that was having on the population of said birds.)
They could also have eaten the eggs.













And small bird bones might or might not survive in midden heaps; soil chemistry would be just one factor.



The native Am. also use a trap.. Simple, dig a tunnel at a few degrees and bait it.. Birds can not walk backwards.


so, they didn't use a burlap sack, with a candle in the back, for them to "walk towards the light"?
and, I didn't really participate, in an ancient american ritual, waiting in the
dark, except, using a flashlight instead of candle?


Flashlight??? Most birds sleep at nite.. Tunnel get smaller to the other end..

Did someone take you snip hunting :?: :P :roll:


well, yeah, they said it was a tradition.......it's how they did it in the "long ago"..........I waited all dang night for a bird to walk towards the light in the back of the sack....knowing, they can't walk backwards.........

I never did understand why they said my clothing scent would alert the birds, and, so made me wait there naked.

dang it was cold.


you guy's beat me to it. I guess I could ask if it was the near extinct passenger snipe you were after?
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Postby Bob » Sat Oct 16, 2010 7:52 pm

Elorrum wrote:
ygmir wrote:
unjonharley wrote:
ygmir wrote:
unjonharley wrote:
theCryptofishist wrote:
Eric wrote:
Elorrum wrote:It just occurred to me that I wasn't sure how the native Americans would catch and eat these pigeons.


There are actually reports from early settlers (post-contact, obviously) on how the Native Americans in the New York area did it. I don't have the book near me so I can't give you the details. I seem to remember it involved nets (speculation on my part since I don't have the references at hand)- but this is after the pigeon population had boomed due to the aforementioned population loss.

I would guess nets as well. I read a book about early man which suggested that net hunting including the entire tribe was probably a very common way of gathering protein pre-neolithic revolution. Nets just don't survive a few thousand years in the ground as readily as spearheads. I can remember sometime in the past couple dozen years reading about
the French tradition of capturing birds with nets for food, while the birds were migrating between Europe and Africa (and what effect that was having on the population of said birds.)
They could also have eaten the eggs.













And small bird bones might or might not survive in midden heaps; soil chemistry would be just one factor.



The native Am. also use a trap.. Simple, dig a tunnel at a few degrees and bait it.. Birds can not walk backwards.


so, they didn't use a burlap sack, with a candle in the back, for them to "walk towards the light"?
and, I didn't really participate, in an ancient american ritual, waiting in the
dark, except, using a flashlight instead of candle?


Flashlight??? Most birds sleep at nite.. Tunnel get smaller to the other end..

Did someone take you snip hunting :?: :P :roll:


well, yeah, they said it was a tradition.......it's how they did it in the "long ago"..........I waited all dang night for a bird to walk towards the light in the back of the sack....knowing, they can't walk backwards.........

I never did understand why they said my clothing scent would alert the birds, and, so made me wait there naked.

dang it was cold.


you guy's beat me to it. I guess I could ask if it was the near extinct passenger snipe you were after?


I always caught them by trolling with a shiny sock.
Amazing desert structures & stuff: http://sites.google.com/site/potatotrap/

"Let us say I suggest you may be human." -- Reverend Mother Gaius Helen Mohiam
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Postby Bob » Sat Oct 16, 2010 8:22 pm

Oh, and it helps if you know the Pidgin mating call.

I'm heading for the last roundup
Auhea wale oe te wahine holo lio
E like kou holo ana me ka o io la
Ke kolo, ke kuli, ke ku i kolo iho oe
Auhea wale oe te wahine holo lio
Pua nani oe Hawai i la
Aloha i ka Hawaiian cowboy
Amazing desert structures & stuff: http://sites.google.com/site/potatotrap/

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