Can't find the brand of canvas cabin tent

Ideas, advice, tips, and tricks regarding shelter, shade, tents, and camping. Yes, this includes RV's too.

Postby Hoolie » Tue Aug 11, 2009 2:19 pm

phil wrote:We set up our Springbar for the first time; photos on flickr at
http://www.flickr.com/photos/civex/sets ... 973886300/

It's the 10x14, which is big till you get stuff in it. The thing Louise and I like is that it has standing headroom wall to wall to wall. We can also walk into the tent, just ducking our heads. Our other tents required us pretty much to crawl in. At 62 and congenitally stiff, that was getting to be a problem, so I'm happy with the door.

Now we'll see if they're as dust-proof as everyone says.

Looks good, Phil. It just needs a little tightening up. I posted a comment on your flickr page explaining how I do this. When it's tighter, it's more solid, and it won't flap in the wind so much. Here's a shot of my Campsite 3:

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w92/ ... ingbar.jpg

As for the dust-proofness on the playa, I think you will be pleased.
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Postby C.f.M. » Tue Feb 02, 2010 6:54 am

They're pretty dust-proof - if you keep the walls tacked down (so the dust doesn't blow in from under the walls) and the front door secured. Close it up tight when you leave to wander.


Though pointless in a pro-canvas thread, here is why I don't want one:

http://obitch.wordpress.com/2010/01/29/ ... vas-tents/
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Postby phil » Tue Feb 02, 2010 12:09 pm

> Though pointless in a pro-canvas thread, here is why I don't want one:

No reasonable countervailing views are pointless. Here are some of the comments and my responses:

> Great for camping in rainy weather (not applicable on the playa, as
> far as I know)

Um, it's rained there: http://www.cieux.com/bm/bm2k.html
In 1996, it rained so hard at the end of the event that people were stranded for a week, if I recall correctly. Louise and I went with a peaked roof shade because our flat roof shade collected enough water to sink one year (don't remember which one).

> There’s no windows for air flow.

There are windows in my Springbar: http://www.flickr.com/photos/civex/sets ... 973886300/
I believe there are more windows in the Kodiak than the Springbar.

> It’s a bear to fold up and takes up a lot of space. And is heavy.
> Too heavy for me.

Absolutely true. Our canvas tent weighs 70 pounds without the stakes and tent poles. It's heavy, and if it's too heavy for you, I have no argument with that.

> They’re too heavy and big.

Too _big_??? HAHAHAHAHAHA! There's no such thing.
Image
http://www.flickr.com/photos/civex/3799197716/in/set-72157621973886300/
Standing headroom wall to wall. Wall to wall. We can stand fully upright throughout the entire tent. We don't have to crawl in the door:
Image
http://www.flickr.com/photos/civex/3798381087/in/set-72157621973886300/

> I couldn’t set it up by myself.
Unarguable. If I can't handle and set up any tent myself, I wouldn't buy it. I'm with you there.

Louise and I used ours for the first time last year, so we have some experience with it in wind and dust storms, but we'll have to see how it holds up over the years. Our experience is that it's worth its weight, but we realize everything's a compromise. Some compromises work for us, some don't. For you, it doesn't work, and you get to make your choice. I see no reason to think you've made a bad choice - I'd say you made the right one.
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Postby C.f.M. » Tue Feb 02, 2010 2:38 pm

Too big to pack and transport. The canvas itself, plus all the stuff to put it up.
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Postby gyre » Tue Feb 02, 2010 3:02 pm

Springbar has many window options and I bet that they would add some more, as long as it isn't on a stressed area like the ends of the square tents.
You don't need windows on the playa though.

I was near Phil's tent in a terrific gust that I was sure would kill us with flying debris.
Completely blinded for a minute.
The only thing that didn't move was their tent.
Completely silent in the wind, due to the stressed design.
My guess is a 90 mph gust.

My only beef with Springbar is the lack of a zipper on the bottom of the door.
Fine everywhere but the playa.
The factory told me $50 to add the zipper to the bottom of the door.
Possible to add triangular windows on the ends of the smaller tents too.

There are much better tents out there.
They just cost more.

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
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Postby phil » Tue Feb 02, 2010 4:22 pm

> My only beef with Springbar is the lack of a zipper on the bottom
> of the door.
> Fine everywhere but the playa.
> The factory told me $50 to add the zipper to the bottom of the door.

Yeah, if I'd known it didn't have a zipper at the bottom of the flap, I'd have paid the fifty bucks to have one put on. There was some dust in the tent after a week out there, but not as bad as other tents I've had. Very livable.

Again, I'm not promoting this tent over all others. Louise and I really liked our Armadillo and would have bought another one, but Moss went under years ago. The Springbar has definite disadvantages, but so far for us the plusses outweigh the minusses.
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Postby gyre » Tue Feb 02, 2010 4:31 pm

Maybe they could still add it?
I told them I didn't want to change the design, just add the zipper.
Make sure you talk to the factory and not customer service.
That quote was today.
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Postby CapSmashy » Wed Feb 03, 2010 8:16 am

C.f.M. wrote:They're pretty dust-proof - if you keep the walls tacked down (so the dust doesn't blow in from under the walls) and the front door secured. Close it up tight when you leave to wander.


Though pointless in a pro-canvas thread, here is why I don't want one:

http://obitch.wordpress.com/2010/01/29/ ... vas-tents/


In every post I make about tents, I talk about suffocating. There’s no windows for air flow.


I have a 10x10 and a 10x14 Kodiak. Both have 4 large windows opposite of each other and ridge vents.

They’re too heavy and big. I know people that camp in one (on the playa and other regionals). It’s a bear to fold up and takes up a lot of space. And is heavy. Too heavy for me.


Your source has made a fatal error and started lumping Springbar and Kodiak tents in with SCA and other historical style canvas pavilions and structures.

I can set up my 10x14 by myself in under 20 minutes. Longest part of the job is putting the stakes in. Tent comes down, rolled and in it's bag in about 10 minutes. Again, the longest part of the job is the ground stakes. Poles are segmented and chained and the longest section is maybe 3 feet or so.

In comparison to a heavy period pavilion as pictured in your link, the Kodiaks and Springbars weigh a lot less.

On the playa, to keep dust out as much as possible you have to keep the doors closed. So it’s a little dark and claustrophic for me. The walls are great, keeps dust and wind out like a charm, but not any more so that the nylon walls on my dome.


You have to keep the doors closed on any structure to keep the dust out on the playa. Not sure what point is trying to be made here. If you get claustrophobic in a 10x10 or 10x14 space with a 6'6" ceiling, your issue is not with the tent and more about needing anxiety meds.

…that’s about it. Plus, they’re expensive and I couldn’t set it up by myself. I need something lightweight, easily transported and easy for me (short and mechanically uninclined) to set up by myself.


Set up has already been covered. One person job, if you can drive a stake, you can set up a Kodiak or Springbar tent. And again, they are very easy to transport as they pack into a relatively small, rolled and handled bundle.

The period style structures your link is confusing Kodiaks and Springbars with are heavy, bulky with big wooden poles and ridge supports.

And yes, there is some expense in buying one of these, but if taken care of, they will last for decades. Why do you think the military is still using Vietnam Era canvas tents? Because they last forever.

IE, my EZ Up!


Without lots of re-enforcing, the EZ up is potential toast on the first day.

Add the side walls and you just made an excellent sail and have a structure that allows dust to happily blow right on in to your living space as the walls do not seal. My experience in the Kodiak tents shows that the only dust in our tents came off of us.

Fits great in the backseat for stacking, super easy to carry and pack up. Stores easily in a closet (just stand it up in the back corner). It looks bigger in that picture than it is.


Same for a Kodiak or Springbar.

but another thing I don’t like is a bunch of guy lines poking out everywhere.


Again, fatal error of confusing heavy canvas period pavilions and military style tents with Kodiak or Springbar. The only guidelines for Kodiak or Springbar are for the deploying door canopy which would be a useless and unneeded gesture on the Playa anyway.

I could just make my own…now, where did I put the number for that blacksmith??


Again, the author shows a clear ignorance in what they are talking about.
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Postby CapSmashy » Wed Feb 03, 2010 8:20 am

phil wrote:> My only beef with Springbar is the lack of a zipper on the bottom
> of the door.
> Fine everywhere but the playa.
> The factory told me $50 to add the zipper to the bottom of the door.

Yeah, if I'd known it didn't have a zipper at the bottom of the flap, I'd have paid the fifty bucks to have one put on. There was some dust in the tent after a week out there, but not as bad as other tents I've had. Very livable.

Again, I'm not promoting this tent over all others. Louise and I really liked our Armadillo and would have bought another one, but Moss went under years ago. The Springbar has definite disadvantages, but so far for us the plusses outweigh the minusses.


Ya gotta pay extra for a bottom zipper on a Springbar? Well that sucks.
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Postby C.f.M. » Wed Feb 03, 2010 8:53 am

CapSmashy wrote:
C.f.M. wrote:They're pretty dust-proof - if you keep the walls tacked down (so the dust doesn't blow in from under the walls) and the front door secured. Close it up tight when you leave to wander.


Though pointless in a pro-canvas thread, here is why I don't want one:

http://obitch.wordpress.com/2010/01/29/ ... vas-tents/


In every post I make about tents, I talk about suffocating. There’s no windows for air flow.


I have a 10x10 and a 10x14 Kodiak. Both have 4 large windows opposite of each other and ridge vents.

They’re too heavy and big. I know people that camp in one (on the playa and other regionals). It’s a bear to fold up and takes up a lot of space. And is heavy. Too heavy for me.


Your source has made a fatal error and started lumping Springbar and Kodiak tents in with SCA and other historical style canvas pavilions and structures.

I can set up my 10x14 by myself in under 20 minutes. Longest part of the job is putting the stakes in. Tent comes down, rolled and in it's bag in about 10 minutes. Again, the longest part of the job is the ground stakes. Poles are segmented and chained and the longest section is maybe 3 feet or so.

In comparison to a heavy period pavilion as pictured in your link, the Kodiaks and Springbars weigh a lot less.

On the playa, to keep dust out as much as possible you have to keep the doors closed. So it’s a little dark and claustrophic for me. The walls are great, keeps dust and wind out like a charm, but not any more so that the nylon walls on my dome.


You have to keep the doors closed on any structure to keep the dust out on the playa. Not sure what point is trying to be made here. If you get claustrophobic in a 10x10 or 10x14 space with a 6'6" ceiling, your issue is not with the tent and more about needing anxiety meds.

…that’s about it. Plus, they’re expensive and I couldn’t set it up by myself. I need something lightweight, easily transported and easy for me (short and mechanically uninclined) to set up by myself.


Set up has already been covered. One person job, if you can drive a stake, you can set up a Kodiak or Springbar tent. And again, they are very easy to transport as they pack into a relatively small, rolled and handled bundle.

The period style structures your link is confusing Kodiaks and Springbars with are heavy, bulky with big wooden poles and ridge supports.

And yes, there is some expense in buying one of these, but if taken care of, they will last for decades. Why do you think the military is still using Vietnam Era canvas tents? Because they last forever.

IE, my EZ Up!


Without lots of re-enforcing, the EZ up is potential toast on the first day.

Add the side walls and you just made an excellent sail and have a structure that allows dust to happily blow right on in to your living space as the walls do not seal. My experience in the Kodiak tents shows that the only dust in our tents came off of us.

Fits great in the backseat for stacking, super easy to carry and pack up. Stores easily in a closet (just stand it up in the back corner). It looks bigger in that picture than it is.


Same for a Kodiak or Springbar.

but another thing I don’t like is a bunch of guy lines poking out everywhere.


Again, fatal error of confusing heavy canvas period pavilions and military style tents with Kodiak or Springbar. The only guidelines for Kodiak or Springbar are for the deploying door canopy which would be a useless and unneeded gesture on the Playa anyway.

I could just make my own…now, where did I put the number for that blacksmith??


Again, the author shows a clear ignorance in what they are talking about.


No, not ignorance (though your ignorance of the tone of humour I wrote with shows in your picking apart of the post. Yes, I'm aware scalloped edges and fancy flags are not the same as the utilitarian ones being discussed here. The blacksmith crack alludes to the article I link to, "For the top of the tent have the blacksmith make a hoop...").

The guide line comment, for example, is referring specifically to the tent shown,

Image

which has a lot of guide lines (or whatever the proper word for all the rope/ties is).

I also type that I am incorrect, and windows are available.

I don't take my EZ Up to the playa. That's why I post so much about my quest for it's playa substitute.

The post is my personal opinion based on my personal experience with canvas tents (helping set them up, spending time in them, breaking them down, packing them up (both in BRC and other places).

"One of the golly-gee fun things about getting ready for Burning Man is asking what you should do. And then trying to figure out, out of the 200 different, often conflicting answers, what you should do."

:wink:

Regardless, I do sincerely thank you for taking the time to read it.
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Postby Boijoy » Wed Feb 03, 2010 9:17 am

I LIKE that tent. & the guide line might keep the hippies away.
&& if you put some led wire on them or solar christmas lights they woudl look SUPER kewell at night.. get that tent yeah yeah !!
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Postby gyre » Wed Feb 03, 2010 9:24 am

Regarding smiths, if I was designing a tent, that's who I would call.

Engineering, design and materials experience, and they have experience making things work in the real world.


A well done tent, especially a stressed design, is a very sophisticated construction.
It's like living with good audio.
After awhile you can spot all the differences.
I went by the No 1 Cabela's on the way home and got to see a bunch of their tents set up out front.
Some good buys there, but not top flight tents.
And some of their most "rugged" had permanent vents in the top.
They didn't have the Kodiak up.

My last good tent was a Jansport.
Everything that annoyed me about it, turned out to be there for strength and durability.
I came to marvel at how perfect every seam and angle was.
It weighed 7 pounds, with the heavy poles and would withstand 100 knot winds.
I like polyester, fibreglas and aluminum tents.

But the springbar has no competition for it's size and price.
I'd love to find one that was better or even lighter.

The springbar is simple compared to a dome.
But it is a square version of a stressed dome.
And the execution counts.
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Postby C.f.M. » Wed Feb 03, 2010 9:24 am

Boijoy wrote:I LIKE that tent. & the guide line might keep the hippies away.
&& if you put some led wire on them or solar christmas lights they woudl look SUPER kewell at night.. get that tent yeah yeah !!


I could substitute barbed wire, it's true!

I'm more worried about busting my drunk ass. 8)
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Re: Can't find the brand of canvas cabin tent

Postby late » Fri Jan 20, 2012 12:29 pm

So did u ever get the bell or kodiak tent CFM?

We're looking at them as well, LOVE the look of the bell, would have to put red stripes on it circus style of course ;)
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