Frequently Asked Questions: Look here first.

Questions, answers, tips & tricks for newbies and veterans alike

Postby Chai Guy » Fri Aug 12, 2005 9:36 pm

Babs,

It really depends on the person too. Some people can go barefoot all week, other people (like me) get playa foot by wearing sandals for just a day.

I think going with sandals during the day and shoes with socks at night and following the prescribed foot care regiment is a good start. Monitor your feet and switch to 100% shoes & clean socks if playa foot begins to appear. Symptoms include dry, scaly skin with cracks around the heels, arches and toes.

Remember that BRC is a pedestrian city and your feet are incredibly important to your experience out there. Take care of them.
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what............

Postby Last Real Burner » Sat Aug 13, 2005 9:23 am

I guess I'm the lucky one. No shoes all week I got playa foot once started in on the vineger and stuff and still went barefoot the rest of the week.


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Postby swampdog » Mon Aug 15, 2005 5:47 pm

Here are some I'm seeing a lot lately:

Q: Hooray! I'm coming to Burning Man for the first time, I'm getting my stuff together kind of at the last minute and now I need to join a Theme Camp! How do I do that?

A: You don't need to join a theme camp. Assuming you are well prepared you can come by yourself/your group of friends you planned to camp with anyway (and if you're not well prepared, a theme camp isn't going to want you anyway). If you really want to find a theme camp, you can search the on line for theme camps (from the main BM site) that interest you and see if they still have spaces. You can also check out your regional to see what camps come out of your area. Camping alone is a fine way for virgins to start in, meet the people in your neighborhood, make friends, explore, have fun! At this late date (2 weeks out) many camps are not taking on new people anyway, too much to do at the last minute just completing their existing plans.

followed by
Q: How do I find a place to park? How far is it from there to where I can camp? Are their restrictions on where you can park/camp? (I had this question my virgin year also)

A: Just drive around (slowly!) until you find a good space to camp, then camp there. Figure your car into your total camp footprint, use it as a windblock. Look an open space that looks big enough for you, neighbors who look interesting; consider if you want to be near the plazas at 3/6/9 or near the loud zone at 10 and 2. There are no bad choices, all locations are winners. Once you park, no driving until it's time to leave. Here's an aerial photo from last year, it may give you an idea of how the cars space out etc.

[img]
http://tinyurl.com/8kh7u
[/img]
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Postby Chai Guy » Mon Aug 15, 2005 6:01 pm

Nice one Swampdog, let's point everyone here!
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Postby bringer » Thu Jan 19, 2006 2:21 pm

Q: Is the 2006 survival guide up yet?
I can't find it on the main site, just the 2005sg.
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Postby capjbadger » Thu Jan 19, 2006 2:28 pm

bringer wrote:Q: Is the 2006 survival guide up yet?
I can't find it on the main site, just the 2005sg.


Along similar lines, when will the 2005 post-burn report be up?
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Postby Lassen Forge » Thu Jan 19, 2006 2:55 pm

The survival guide will be up prolly in a few months - I would doubt it's even close to being written. The 2005 is a good place to start, tho...

The 2005 afterburn probably right before opener of 2006. Doesn't mean a lot of it's not done yet, but there's a lot of info to digest and things to implement for next year. Think if it kind of like a company's annual report.

bb
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Postby bringer » Thu Jan 19, 2006 3:06 pm

I guess the only reason I brought it up was this little message that came with my tix confirmation:

"The 2006 Survival Guide is online! All participants, new and returning, must read it..."
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afterburn

Postby Booker » Sun Mar 05, 2006 5:42 pm

The 2005 afterburn probably right before opener of 2006.


Q: Is this accurate?

This is probably not accurate. The 04 Afterburn was published much later than usual in June 2005. Most years since the first (2001) it's been published in March-April timeframe. All but a tiny bit of the content for Afterburn 2005 is in the can now, and the formatters are, I'm sure, busily coding away.

The Afterburns provide some insight into what's happened in various areas, and what organizer types plan to do about it next year. Survival Guide is more important reading, but if you're interested, go here:

http://afterburn.burningman.com
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Burning stuff

Postby robbidobbs » Wed May 31, 2006 5:45 pm

What can I burn after the Event is over?
Anything that you wouldn't mind burning in your own backyard or your fireplace. Remember, we all have to breath the smoke.

I've spent whole days for two years post event monitoring the burn platforms, and you wouldn't believe the crap that people throw in: particle board, foam, plastic, synthetic cloth, glued and painted materials. Cripes. These don't go in.
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Postby deeda » Sat Jul 22, 2006 12:00 am

Forgive me if this topic has already been covered in this thread, if so i guess imissed it.

I was just wondering about altitude sickness, it seems to be enough of a health issue (at 4000 ft) but i noticed it was not mentioned on the website or in the survival guide. I would liketo know how common/ how much of a risk it is, and some tips on relieving the systems and avoiding it. I have already looked at an altitude site or something but im more interested in how it goes down on the playa.
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Postby robbidobbs » Sat Jul 22, 2006 2:02 am

As I'm going downhill to the Playa (I live at 4100 ft), I personally don't get it, but I was 1st level Triage at Rainbow Gathering 2004 in the Modoc Nat Forest at 7000', and I got to see it 2nd hand a LOT. It basically is a euphoric/dizzy/out-of-sorts way that can turn into a blistering headache if you don't stay hydrated. Which we had to deal with a LOT. We had a rule of thumb: whatever the injury, treat dehydration first, and the rest is easy. Yah, I got to see a lot of kids with their eyes rolling around. I would ask them: are you accustom to being at 7000 ft? And they'd look at me like: oh yah, I forgot. Crap, I need to sit down. Then I'd hand them a gallon of water, and tell them do not leave the med camp until it's gone. Tough love, baby.

So if you're coming in from sea level, stay fucking hydrated and the altitude sickness won't hit you like a wall.
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Re: Just because I keep hearing these questions over and ove

Postby Lust » Mon Jul 24, 2006 8:58 am

Q: Can't the pottie vendor take better care servicing them? Sometimes there is shit on the seat, or piddle on the floor.
A: Aim better. Also, the reason for the icky-ness is due to an evil practice called hovering. Park yer butt on the seat, and you won't get cooties. If there is some wetness on the seat, just wipe it down with TP and then park your butt. The vendors are just as pissed off as we all are when a unit is fouled. They service the potties every 6 hrs per contract, and do a DAMN good job considering the abuse people put them through.


If you are really freaked about sitting down on the seat, bring a wet nap and wipe down the seat, then place the wet nap and anything else that doesn't belong in the porta potty into a zip lock bag and take it with you, including apple cores! Come on people, no food in the potties!!!
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Re: Burning stuff

Postby Ugly Dougly » Mon Jul 24, 2006 9:26 am

robbidobbs wrote:What can I burn after the Event is over?
Anything that you wouldn't mind burning in your own backyard or your fireplace. Remember, we all have to breath the smoke.

I've spent whole days for two years post event monitoring the burn platforms, and you wouldn't believe the crap that people throw in: particle board, foam, plastic, synthetic cloth, glued and painted materials. Cripes. These don't go in.


Please. No Plastic Burning This Year. We all live downwind.
Please to visit PAGE TWO.
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Burning Stuff

Postby RachelZ3 » Tue Jul 25, 2006 9:26 pm

Q: I plan to bring a hibachi and some BBQ bags.
http://www.shop.com/op/~Kingsford_Bbq_Bag-prod-9729134

I have used them before (10 years ago) and its so easy, just light the bag and the coals are lit, no problem to cook.

If I use them on the playa- I am in a theme camp- do I have to go to a special area ? When the bags burn, in the wind it is possible that a piece of the bag will be moop- although I dont *think* they would fly as a lit piece of paper that could burn someone's tent. I used them at a Folk Festival camping area with no problem, but maybe this is a different thing.

I think the coals burn to just ashes. When they are cool I can bag 'em but until they are cool I imagine the ashes would join the playa dust.

Is this acceptable?

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Postby AntiM » Wed Jul 26, 2006 6:46 am

Personally I wouldn't mess with this at all. You're underestimating the wind; if it can pick up a full size dome and roll it, it can toss charcoal. Once you light those briquettes, you're pretty much stuck next to your bbq until they're 100% out and cold. And the ashes will be a mess even if you're meticulous about bagging. Does this hibachi hae a clamp-on lid? How big are the airholes? Will it drop ash on the ground, and if so, what will you put under it to keep them off the playa?

Propnae or butane are your friends. Really.

Or maybe I'm just related to Hank Hill...
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Hibachi

Postby RachelZ3 » Wed Jul 26, 2006 7:48 am

AntiM wrote:Personally I wouldn't mess with this at all. You're underestimating the wind; if it can pick up a full size dome and roll it, it can toss charcoal. Once you light those briquettes, you're pretty much stuck next to your bbq until they're 100% out and cold. And the ashes will be a mess even if you're meticulous about bagging. Does this hibachi hae a clamp-on lid? How big are the airholes? Will it drop ash on the ground, and if so, what will you put under it to keep them off the playa?

Propnae or butane are your friends. Really.

Or maybe I'm just related to Hank Hill...


i hear you

This is the hibachi:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0000S ... e&n=284507

it's heavy, cast iron. i do understand that if the winds kick up, it could lift the hibachi even if it is 19 pounds of iron. I could keep water beside it and pour the water on the coals when I am done cooking- and if the wind kicks up while i am cooking.

I wonder if the wind would be able to scoop up coals from inside the hibachi- I could put the coals under the grate.

As I remember the coals only last an hour or so. I dont need to use a whole bag each time.

in the preparation guide I read something about wire mesh and burn barrels. I could surround the hibachi with the wire mesh - hopefully dug into the playa to catch any stray lit bits of paper or scooped-up bits of coal.

When the hibachi is doused I can move it into my tent into a foil-lined trunk.

I'll check to see if there are holes in the bottom of the hibachi. If there are, I will put something under it like a big foil pan.

Does that sound acceptable?

Our camp will have a kitchen and a stove, so I will use that too, but generally propane and butane scare me.

Thanks again!
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Postby Silver 2 » Wed Jul 26, 2006 8:24 am

OK, personally I think this is all a lot more work than it is worth but I'm lazy. Here is a suggestion:

Get two foil pans the same size and several spring clamps. Put the hibachi in the bottom pan and cut holes the side (high up) the bottom pan and in the top and sides of the top one. Get your fire started and start cooking, put the top pan on and hold down with the spring clamps, your food will cook faster in a oven anyway. The main goal of this rig is to keep charcoal (which is mainly coal BTW) off the Playa. This is really true if you have to dump water on it. Those little doors on the side of the hibachi will let a slurry of 'stuff' pour out, the pan will keep the slurry off the playa. Scraping that stuff up is not fun, I have watched people do it (with an Earth Guardian standing there glaring at them, actually she was yelling at them when I first wandered over).

Note: If we get winds that will lift that hibachi we are all going to be in a world of hurt.
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Postby AntiM » Wed Jul 26, 2006 9:34 am

Sounds like you have a handle on it. Heh, I'm afraid of charcoal!
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Neat little propane grill

Postby ansi » Wed Jul 26, 2006 10:45 am

Why not try this puppy instead of a hibachi? It will still have the flight problem if the wind kicks up, but no coals and lasts for hours on one of the wee tanks of propane:

http://www.amazon.com/Coleman-RoadTrip- ... ome-garden

We got one on sale at Kmart for $25.
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Hibachis on the Playa

Postby RachelZ3 » Wed Jul 26, 2006 11:53 am

Silver 2 wrote:OK, personally I think this is all a lot more work than it is worth but I'm lazy.


Ja, I am lazy too, and cheap as well. I am trying to figure out if it's more trouble and expense to return this stuff I already bought, or to make it work. Thanks to you I think it's the latter! I love your concept below. Another reason I am doing this is the self-reliant thing. Just in case the shared kitchen gets to be a problem, like everyone wanting to use the stove at the same time or some other issue, I want to be able to say, "No problem, I can do it myself."

Here is a suggestion:

Get two foil pans the same size and several spring clamps. Put the hibachi in the bottom pan and cut holes the side (high up) the bottom pan and in the top and sides of the top one. Get your fire started and start cooking, put the top pan on and hold down with the spring clamps, your food will cook faster in a oven anyway. The main goal of this rig is to keep charcoal (which is mainly coal BTW) off the Playa. This is really true if you have to dump water on it. Those little doors on the side of the hibachi will let a slurry of 'stuff' pour out, the pan will keep the slurry off the playa. Scraping that stuff up is not fun, I have watched people do it (with an Earth Guardian standing there glaring at them, actually she was yelling at them when I first wandered over).


Brilliant- cheap and brilliant. All of it can be reused and recycled as well. Also helpful that you have had experience with using coal/charcoal on the playa. Helluva picture of the Earth Guardian scenario. I am trying to be less wasteful and damaging to the Earth, not more. I might even splurge on some of those flavored wood chip things. MMMMMmmmm nice grilled veggies for the vegetarians in our camp. Can't do that on propane, can ya?

Note: If we get winds that will lift that hibachi we are all going to be in a world of hurt.


I was wondering about that.... :?

Thanks all!
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Postby PatfromOre » Wed Jul 26, 2006 6:38 pm

I use wood chips in my propane bbq all the time. just soak them in water before. I made a small tray out of foil and just put the drained chips in it. My favorite is Hickory or mesquite.. mmm good!
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Storing Tent after Bman...

Postby RachelZ3 » Sat Aug 05, 2006 8:51 pm

Okey, I finally saw the wisdom. Bought the BBQ ansi showed me and ordered some mesquite thanks to PatfromOne

THANK YOU.

Now I'd like to ask... at the end of Bman I will pack up my dusty tent. If I stored that tent until the next Bman and it's full of alkalai playa dust (and hopefully nothing else) is that good? Do I have to wash the dust out before I pack it up?

I'm thinking of storing the tent in Reno - is why I ask. No chance to wash it out before it's stored, and I might have a nasty surprise in 2007....

Thanks
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Q: I saw several RVs with tire blowouts on the road to Black

Postby DustMeOff » Sun Aug 06, 2006 3:15 pm

Also, when leaving, stay on the road out. There are a lot of ass holes that don't pull out their rebar for what ever reason. It will split your steel belted radials and cause problems when you get going on the freeway.
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Dust Masks?

Postby BAS » Tue Aug 15, 2006 6:28 pm

I've heard that the playa is supposed to be very dusty this year, which prompts me to ask: What should I look for in a dust mask? The prices really vary, and so do the design. Should I get one designed to filter out mold, vapors, paint, pollen, or what?


Thanks,

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Do things that have never been done."
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Postby can't sit still » Tue Aug 15, 2006 6:48 pm

BAS, I'd look for a good dust mask. Don't worry about solvents, paint, vapors or thinner. Playa dust is probably as fine as spores so if you get a spore rated mask, it should be OK.
The element isn't as important as the fit. I just bought a mask for sandblasting. The cheapy masks never seem to fit well.
I'm bringing an extra pack of elements.
Best to get something comfortable. Masks are a pain in the heat.
So are goggles.
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Postby BAS » Tue Aug 15, 2006 7:03 pm

That sounds more like one of the less expensive ones, then. Unfortunately, I don't think the stores are likely to let me try them on, so I might have to rely on guesswork and luck to get a good fit. There isn't much of a selection as far as the goggles go-- and I need to find something which will fit over my glasses. (Speaking of which, durning the day, would my sunglasses work as goggles? They are those kind which fit over glasses and cover the sides of the eyes, too.)

Thanks!


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Postby can't sit still » Tue Aug 15, 2006 8:01 pm

BAS, you might look at an industrial supply place for a mask.

mcmaster-carr has everything,,,cheap.
Check out motorcycle goggles. They should fit over glasses. The sunglasses will cut down on the dust in your eyes but,,,you will have dust stuck inside and out to them.

Motocross googles are made specifically to seal out dust and also most of them fit over glasses. Scott makes good ones. The "peach" colored lens gives you the best visibility when there is a lot of glare.
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Postby BAS » Tue Aug 15, 2006 8:17 pm

Okay. Thanks. I get paid on Thursday, so I will try to look for some then.


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Goggles

Postby Boijoy » Thu Aug 24, 2006 9:27 am

Hi, I found Home Depot or any other hardware store has "safety goggles" they are clear, plastic and about $ 4.00. They fit nicely over sunglasses in a dust storm.. but kinda hot so you won't want to wear them all the time.
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