GREATEST BASEBALL FANS IN THE WORLD?

All things outside of Burning Man.

Postby Apollonaris Zeus » Fri Oct 15, 2004 3:17 pm

PS- My prediction: Boston takes round three in eleven innings!


A II Z
User avatar
Apollonaris Zeus
 
Posts: 3716
Joined: Sun Sep 14, 2003 11:17 am

Postby cowboyangel » Fri Oct 15, 2004 3:43 pm

right..thanks zeus, I can always count on you...right now I'm doin a rain dance
"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believe is false."- William Casey, CIA Director 1981
User avatar
cowboyangel
 
Posts: 6987
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 10:32 pm

Postby Sandwichman » Fri Oct 15, 2004 3:45 pm

Apollonaris Zeus wrote:PS- My prediction: Boston takes round three in eleven innings!


A II Z


This is the point where the team will wake up sweating during the middle of the game and realize they are down by 4 runs in the 8th.

Jason
oonsa oonsa for your feets click here
User avatar
Sandwichman
 
Posts: 2120
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2004 11:29 pm
Location: Portland OR

Postby cowboyangel » Sat Oct 16, 2004 12:28 am

thanks for the rain God.....now Pedro will have plenty of rest!
"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believe is false."- William Casey, CIA Director 1981
User avatar
cowboyangel
 
Posts: 6987
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 10:32 pm

Postby Simply Joel » Sun Oct 17, 2004 7:27 am

Apollonaris Zeus wrote:PS- My prediction: Boston takes round three in eleven innings!
A II Z


DOH!
October 17, 2004
YANKEES LEAD SERIES, 3-0
Yankees' Offensive Express Flattens Boston's Hopes
By TYLER KEPNER

BOSTON, Oct. 16 - At the First Baptist Church here, a few blocks from Fenway Park at the corner of Commonwealth and Clarendon, the subject for this Sunday's service is: "Why Does God Allow Suffering?" For the Boston Red Sox faithful, the topic is painfully appropriate.

If there are any believers left, the Yankees are stomping on their faith. The Yankees humiliated the Red Sox in Game 3 of the American League Championship Series on Saturday, 19-8, all but sealing their 40th World Series berth in front of their bitter rivals.

The Yanks have won every game of this best-of-seven series, and they would need an unprecedented collapse to lose the pennant. No team in baseball history has recovered from a 3-0 deficit to win a postseason series, and the Red Sox seem ill-equipped to try.

Their pitching collapsed under a torrent of runs, the most ever scored by the Yankees in a postseason game. Hideki Matsui had five hits and five runs batted in. Gary Sheffield had four hits and four R.B.I. The Yankees bashed and bashed and the Red Sox had no answer.

Boston's scheduled Game 4 starter, Tim Wakefield, absorbed much of the damage in the middle innings, allowing five runs. Whoever starts Game 4 - it will probably be Derek Lowe - had better try something different. The Yankees could not be stopped.

Their 19 runs were the second most in postseason history; Boston scored 23 against Cleveland in Game 4 of the 1999 division series. The Yankees had eight doubles, the most in a postseason game in 79 years.

Matsui slugged two homers, Alex Rodriguez and Sheffield one each. The Red Sox added to the scoring deluge, knocking out Kevin Brown after two innings and helping make this the highest-scoring game in League Championship Series history.

But it was the Yankees' night, and it almost certainly will be the Yankees' series. They won Game 3 on the one-year anniversary of Aaron Boone's series-ending homer in the 2003 A.L.C.S., a seven-game thriller that stands as one of the most riveting postseason series ever.

This series has been pure dominance by the Yankees, who have trailed in just one inning and seem poised to sweep the series on Sunday.

Before Saturday, sixty-one times in baseball history, a team has fallen behind by 3-0 in a best-of-seven-game series. All 61 times, that team has lost the series. Nothing in Boston baseball is considered a coincidence, so it may have been bad karma that the Red Sox started a pitcher, Bronson Arroyo, who wears No. 61.

From the first batter, Arroyo was terrible. He walked Derek Jeter to lead off the game, and after two balls to Alex Rodriguez, catcher Jason Varitek visited Arroyo on the mound. Rodriguez soon doubled into the left-field corner, scoring Jeter.

Two batters later, Hideki Matsui - now a certified Red Sox killer - ripped a high fastball into the Red Sox bullpen for a two-run homer. The Yankees had a 3-0 lead, and Arroyo would throw 31 pitches in the inning.

Kevin Brown threw even more in the second, when the Yankees lost the lead and trailed for the first time in the series. Again, the rally started with a leadoff walk. Trot Nixon then bashed a homer, and after Bill Mueller's one-out double, the fans chanted Brown's first name.

He could not get control of the inning. With two outs, Johnny Damon bounced a hard single - his first hit of the series - off the glove of first baseman John Olerud. A run scored. After a walk, Manny Ramirez's sharp grounder ate up Jeter for an error. Another run. It was 4-3 Boston, and Brown did not come back for the third inning.

Arroyo did, but not for long. He hung a curveball to Rodriguez that soared over the Green Monster, tying the score. A walk and a Matsui double chased Arroyo, who was charged with two more runs after a single by Bernie Williams and a balk by reliever Ramiro Mendoza.

The Yankees led by 6-4, but Boston came right back against a shaky Javier Vazquez. The first five hitters he faced did this: single, strikeout, double, walk, double. The score was tied, 6-6, but it could have been worse.

After Sheffield overran Orlando Cabrera's double in right field, a relay from Williams to second baseman Miguel Cairo to Posada nailed Mueller at the plate. It was the second time the Red Sox had been thrown out on the bases; Ramirez had made the last out of the first inning at third base, pegged by Sheffield.

The game was a mess, but at least, for the Red Sox, it was tied. Again, though, their pitching folded. Mendoza hit Cairo with a pitch to start the fourth, and after Curtis Leskanic walked Rodriguez, he grooved a pitch to Sheffield.

Sheffield wagged his bat vigorously, as he does when he is especially comfortable against a pitcher, and hammered the pitch into the Green Monster seats. Leskanic jumped and spun in the air, slamming his spikes on the dirt. For Boston, it was crushing: with one swing, the Red Sox had gone from being tied to trailing by three runs, 9-6.

The Yankees piled on later in the inning, when Ruben Sierra slammed a two-run triple off Tim Wakefield, Boston's scheduled starter for Game 4. Through three and a half innings - 2 hours 10 minutes of play - the hitters had seen a staggering 201 pitches, belting 19 for hits.

The offensive onslaught was quickly turning historic. In the top of the fifth, after consecutive run-scoring doubles by Rodriguez and Sheffield made it 13-6, the teams had broken the League Championship Series record for runs scored in a game.

Vazquez was also settling in. With two on and one out in the fourth, he got a break when Varitek lined to Olerud, who caught Ortiz off the bag for an inning-ending double play. In the bottom of the fifth, Vazquez worked the first 1-2-3 inning of the game.

He survived a leadoff double in the sixth, retiring the next three hitters and ending the inning by striking out Ramirez on a curveball. The best Red Sox hitters were succumbing to the Yankees' fifth starter.

A few innings later, Boston was down by 3-0 in the series. The faithful need a miracle, which is never a Red Sox specialty. The devoted must believe in the unseen.

INSIDE PITCH

Yankees first baseman John Olerud left the game in the sixth inning with a bruised left instep after running out a ground ball. He received cautionary X-rays at Fenway Park, which were negative. Tony Clark replaced him. ... Saturday's game lasted 4 hours 20 minutes, the longest nine-inning game in postseason history. ... Bernie Williams's single in the third inning gave him 45 hits in League Championship Series play, breaking Pete Rose's record for that playoff round.


Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company
Simply Joel
 
Posts: 3483
Joined: Wed Mar 31, 2004 10:08 am
Location: Land of Lincoln

Re: GREATEST BASEBALL FANS IN THE WORLD?

Postby Simply Joel » Sun Oct 17, 2004 10:32 am

cowboyangel wrote:The Red Sox fans, of course

October 17, 2004
TEAM PSYCHOLOGY
Maybe Red Sox Fans Enjoy Their Pain
By BENEDICT CAREY

HERE'S a soothing thought, Red Sox fans: Losing isn't everything.

True, social scientists who study sports have found plenty of reasons for fans to root for a winner, like basking in the reflected glory of the team, finding a community of friends, even buffering oneself against feelings of despair. The sudden pleasure of watching a walk-off home run or overtime goal can touch the deepest emotional centers of the brain, research suggests, and even make some supporters feel more socially confident and attractive.

But those who are repeatedly denied the pleasures of winning find other compensations, which psychologists say go beyond the shallow charms of being simply a lovable underdog. "Long-suffering is not quite the right phrase, because at some level, I think, we do like it," said Christopher Peterson, a psychologist at the University of Michigan who is a Red Sox and Cubs fan. "So much of the human condition is about striving."

Make no mistake: the Red Sox nation wants nothing more than to win it all, shake off the team's history and throw a party to transcend all hangovers. And a defeat of the New York Yankees might be even sweeter.

But years of futility forces fans to express their identification in ways that go beyond merely celebrating wins and mourning losses. Loyalty to the club at all costs, an interest in the history of the team and emotional resilience often count more to supporters of cursed teams than victorious ones, said Dr. Christian End, a psychologist at Xavier University in Cincinnati who studies the relation between sports affiliation and self-presentation.

And these fans can be very appealing. In one study among 87 college students, Dr. End found that supporters of losing squads are if anything viewed more positively by their peers than fans of successful teams.

"No one can accuse you of being a lightweight fan," Dr. End said. "You've creatively changed the dimensions of comparison to include not just the outcome, the score, but measures of character."

People who root for losers also quickly learn how to explain and adjust to failure, skills that psychologists say are emotionally protective. Fans often come up with a short list of bad omens, wrong-headed decisions and misfortune.

"Injuries, officiating, the weather, some player's attitude, the curse - fans of unsuccessful clubs are particularly good at finding explanations other than their team is a bunch of chokers," said Dr. Daniel L. Wann, a Cub fan and psychologist at Murray State University in Murray, Ky., who has spent a career studying sports affiliation. Some explanations are no more than excuses or superstition. Many Cubs supporters still blame a fan who interfered with a foul ball during last year's National League playoffs for sinking the entire season, despite costly errors made by players on the field.

In special cases, fans agree on the cause of the loss, like the 1986 World Series, when Bill Buckner, the Red Sox first baseman, missed a ground ball, allowing the New York Mets to win. Other legitimate explanations, like injuries to key players, allow fans to take their team off the hook, soften the emotional blow of losing and salvage their emotional investment in the franchise.

This ability to consider multiple and combined reasons for failure - of spreading blame, if appropriate - can be especially helpful to people who blame themselves for things they have very little control over. It's a strategy that comes in very handy in other areas of personal life, said Dr. David Zald, a psychologist at Vanderbilt University. For instance, it can help any parent explain to a 7-year-old why her soccer team just lost by five goals.

Finally, supporting a losing team gives fans a psychological trump card. The long-denied supporters of teams like the Chicago White Sox, the Los Angeles Kings, the Colorado Rockies - the list is too long print, but you know who you are - know that one day, their team will almost certainly win it all, and the magnificence of that coming victory grows in the imagination with every blown save, every fumble, every mind-boggling collapse.

They know, too, that the fantasies of this deliverance are so cherished that the championship itself, if and when it happens, may somehow fall short.

The party will end, the curse vanish, and there will be no more heroic striving toward a paradise not yet found, but therefore not yet lost.

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company
Simply Joel
 
Posts: 3483
Joined: Wed Mar 31, 2004 10:08 am
Location: Land of Lincoln

Postby cowboyangel » Sun Oct 17, 2004 4:48 pm

The Jews wait for the Messiah. Boston waits for the Red Sox. Adversity can either bring out the best or the worst in people. I choose to look for the lessons here, hence, the best. In a previous post I mentioned the Japanese proverb:
Seven times down, eight times up

-this is how I personally choose to deal with this provative situation.
I love the Red Sox and I will always believe in them.
"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believe is false."- William Casey, CIA Director 1981
User avatar
cowboyangel
 
Posts: 6987
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 10:32 pm

Postby cowboyangel » Sun Oct 17, 2004 10:53 pm

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image



......8x
"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believe is false."- William Casey, CIA Director 1981
User avatar
cowboyangel
 
Posts: 6987
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 10:32 pm

Postby Simply Joel » Mon Oct 18, 2004 1:17 pm

like a cat toying with its prey

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

October 18, 2004
YANKEES LEAD SERIES, 3-1
Yankees Choke on Their Own Medicine
By TYLER KEPNER

BOSTON, Monday, Oct. 18 - It may have been the last gasp for the Boston Red Sox' self-styled rebels with a cause. The World Series is still a long shot, an impossible dream, as they once said here. But the Red Sox still have a chance.

The Yankees were three outs from sweeping their tortured rivals in Game 4 of the American League Championship Series on Sunday, with Mariano Rivera facing the bottom of the lineup in the bottom of the ninth inning.

But the Red Sox tied the score then and won it in the 12th, 6-4, when David Ortiz lined a two-run game-ending homer into the Yankees' bullpen off Paul Quantrill. Fenway Park, which played a sad host to a 19-8 massacre by the Yankees on Saturday, was thumping. The Red Sox had their first victory in the best-of-seven-game series after three discouraging defeats.

"I'm a firm believer in momentum in a short series," Yankees Manager Joe Torre said. "But we have to certainly look at the big picture and see where we are."

Quantrill, the Yankees' fifth pitcher of the game, started the 12th and gave up a leadoff single to Manny Ramirez before Ortiz connected with his latest two-run game-ending blast. Ortiz won the division series against the Anaheim Angels in the same way on Oct. 8. That was the last game the Red Sox had won before Sunday.

"Ortiz is a great hitter," said Quantrill, who threw him an inside fastball. "He beat me. I felt pretty good. I just didn't get my job done."

No team has ever even forced a Game 7 after trailing by 3-0 in a best-of-seven-game series. But the Red Sox have made this intriguing, if only for their next two starters: Pedro Martínez in Game 5 and Curt Schilling in a possible Game 6.

The Yankees almost always win when Martínez pitches, but he at least gives Boston a chance to send the series back to Yankee Stadium. Schilling, the ace with a dislocated tendon in his right ankle, had an encouraging bullpen session on Sunday.

"He did very well," Red Sox Manager Terry Francona said. "As far as I'm concerned, it's not an issue. We've just got to get to Game 6."

With a 4-3 lead after seven innings, the Yankees must have thought their next game would be Saturday, when the World Series begins.

After two scoreless innings by Tanyon Sturtze, Rivera took over for the eighth. Torre was bypassing Tom Gordon to seize the pennant with his best reliever.

Rivera retired the last three batters in the eighth but walked Kevin Millar to start the ninth. After the game, that was what gnawed at Rivera.

"I don't see it as frustrating," Rivera said. "I see it as: I walked the first guy. I can't do that. That was how they tied the game."

Dave Roberts pinch-ran, and Rivera tried to hold him close. But Roberts got a big lead and stole second just ahead of Jorge Posada's strong throw.

Up next was Bill Mueller, who pierced some of Rivera's invincibility with a two-run, game-ending homer in July. That was one of seven saves Rivera has blown against Boston since the start of the 2001 season.

Mueller singled to center, scoring Roberts from second to tie the score at 4-4. Rivera got the ball back and whipped it into his glove, a rare expression of emotion. Pinch-hitter Doug Mientkiewicz bunted back to Rivera, who had no play at second and fired to first, in time.

With one out and a runner at third, the Red Sox were a fly ball from a victory. They got a bouncer to first by Johnny Damon, but they also got a break. Tony Clark - playing for John Olerud, who is on crutches with a bruised left instep - bobbled the ball. By the time Clark secured it, Damon was safe.

Orlando Cabrera struck out, but Rivera walked Manny Ramirez to load the bases for Ortiz. He popped out to second base, ending the inning with the score tied, 4-4.

"I can tell you one thing right now," Ortiz said. "Rivera, he's throwing the best that I have seen him pitch since last year. It's hard to score on Rivera. When he makes mistakes, that's when you have the opportunity."

The Red Sox were alive, and they had their closer, Keith Foulke, to thank. Summoned in the seventh inning - the way Rollie Fingers and Bruce Sutter once were - Foulke had worked two and two-thirds scoreless innings, allowing no hits.

Alan Embree worked a scoreless 10th inning, but Miguel Cairo lashed a single to right to start the 11th. Derek Jeter bunted him to second, and Alex Rodriguez followed with a low liner. Cabrera, the shortstop, dived to his right and speared it.

Embree fell behind Gary Sheffield, 3-0, then threw an intentional ball four. Manager Terry Francona called on a fresh left-hander, the submariner Mike Myers, who walked Hideki Matsui on four pitches.

In came Curtis Leskanic, who was torched in Boston's 19-8 Game 3 loss. But Leskanic induced a pop out to center by Bernie Williams, and the Yankees left the bases loaded.

Hernández had pitched only three innings in the past 24 days, trying to recover from a tired right shoulder. He said he would come back when he could throw all his pitches.

Derek Lowe was a worthy rival. Initially snubbed for a playoff start, Lowe was needed after Tim Wakefield pitched in relief Saturday.

Lowe retired the side in the first and survived a leadoff double by Matsui in the second. But with two outs in the third, Derek Jeter hit a hard single off the glove of third baseman Mueller. It was a bad break for Lowe because of what happened next.

Rodriguez swung at Lowe's first pitch and launched it to left-center field. It cleared a billboard over the Green Monster seats and carried onto Landsdowne Street for a mammoth two-run homer.

Hernández guarded the 2-0 lead for two innings, retiring the side in the third and fourth, when the Red Sox saw only eight pitches. But he tired in the fifth.

Hernández walked Millar - then batting .143 in the series - on four pitches. Twice in the next four batters, the Yankees had a chance to pull off a double play but failed. The result was a two-out, two-on situation for Cabrera.

Hernández got ahead, 0-2, then tried to get Cabrera to chase two breaking balls well out of the strike zone. Cabrera hit a foul and then smacked a grounder through the right side of the infield, scoring Mueller with Boston's first run.

A walk to Ramirez brought up the left-handed-hitting Ortiz, and Torre stuck with Hernández, even though his lone left-hander, Felix Heredia, was warming in the bullpen.

Heredia has held Ortiz to one hit in six career at-bats, but he has been horribly erratic this season. Hernández kept pitching, and Ortiz singled to right, scoring two runs and putting the Red Sox ahead, 3-2.

It was only the second inning all series in which the Yankees had been trailing, and they did not trail for long. With one out in the sixth, Matsui bashed a triple over Damon's head in center field. It was his eighth extra-base hit of the series - establishing a postseason record - and Francona popped from the dugout. A pending free agent, Lowe had probably just thrown his final pitch for Boston.

Francona's move backfired. Facing Mike Timlin, Bernie Williams chopped a ball between the mound and third base, and Matsui scored.

After a walk to Jorge Posada, Varitek threw out Williams at third on a pitch that bounced away from him. But Ruben Sierra beat out an infield single, and Clark chopped a grounder between first and second.

Mark Bellhorn dived for it and knocked the ball down, but he dropped it when he tried to pick it up off the grass. The third infield single of the inning scored Posada to put the Yankees ahead, 4-3.

"We are playing against a team that is strong all the way around," Ortiz said. "Whenever you get an opportunity to win a game against them, you've got to try hard, because they don't give you a chance. We are 3-1 right now. You never know what can happen."


Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company
Simply Joel
 
Posts: 3483
Joined: Wed Mar 31, 2004 10:08 am
Location: Land of Lincoln

Postby cowboyangel » Mon Oct 18, 2004 8:32 pm

cowboyangel wrote:Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image



......8x



we are watching baseball history being made!
Love, Cowboyangel
"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believe is false."- William Casey, CIA Director 1981
User avatar
cowboyangel
 
Posts: 6987
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 10:32 pm

Postby Simply Joel » Tue Oct 19, 2004 5:00 am

don't count your chickens before they hatch, CA

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

October 19, 2004
YANKEES LEAD SERIES, 3-2
Even Longer: Red Sox Win Game 5 in 14 Innings
By TYLER KEPNER

BOSTON, Oct. 18 - It was as if David Ortiz wanted to give a gift to every fan at Fenway Park. They had already made him a folk hero, and his legend was about to grow.

Batting in the bottom of the 14th inning, striving to stay alive at the plate and in the series, Ortiz fouled off two pitches, then four, then six, from Yankees reliever Esteban Loaiza. One of the fouls was a blast down the right-field line, nearly hooking around the foul pole.

"I'm the kind of guy, I fight," Ortiz said. "That's all I got."

A home run would have been poetic. Ortiz, after all, had ended the previous two Boston Red Sox victories with a home run, including the night before. But with runners at first and second and two outs, all he needed was a hit.

For the Red Sox, this meant everything. A loss would have ended their season and forced 35,120 fans - Yankees haters all, it seemed - to watch the Yankees clinch the pennant. After nine pitches, Ortiz dug in.

Loaiza, the Yankees' seventh reliever, had tried enough sinkers low and away. He went to his best pitch, a cutter, and Ortiz punched it into center field for a clean single, bringing home Johnny Damon with the winning run in a 5-4 Red Sox victory in the fifth game of the American League Championship Series.

At Houston, the Astros defeated the St. Louis Cardinals, 3-0, to take a lead of 3 games to 2 in the National League Championship Series.

After winning the first three games of the A.L.C.S., the Yankees are down to a 3-2 lead. They must face Curt Schilling in Game 6 on Tuesday at Yankee Stadium, though heavy rain is in the forecast.

"I'm sure they're feeling pretty good about themselves," said the Yankees' Derek Jeter, who had a three-run double off Pedro Martínez in the sixth inning. "If they didn't win, they were going home. They did exactly what they wanted to do. But we put ourselves in a good position. We put ourselves right where we wanted to be. The last two games, it just didn't happen. I like our chances."

Those chances were much better in the ninth inning on Sunday, when the Yankees were three outs away from a sweep. But Mariano Rivera blew the save, and Ortiz's home run won the game in the 12th inning. Rivera blew another save in the eighth inning on Monday.

It would be hard to imagine other teams doing this: two elimination games on two nights, both of historic length. The first took 5 hours 2 minutes, the longest game in the history of the A.L.C.S. Monday's was even longer, at 5 hours 49 minutes, the longest in postseason history. In a period of almost 27 hours, the teams played 26 riveting innings.

"It's been three days," the Yankees' Alex Rodriguez said, "and it feels like we've been here a month."

Rodriguez was on deck when Jeter made the Yankees' final out against Tim Wakefield, who redeemed himself for allowing the pennant-winning homer to Aaron Boone in Game 7 last fall. When the Red Sox needed a savior on Monday, Wakefield was there, throwing three scoreless innings and overcoming three passed balls by Jason Varitek in the 13th.

Both teams' bullpens were exhausted by then. The Yankees had turned to Loaiza, their last available pitcher, after Paul Quantrill hurt his knee pursuing Damon's popped bunt in the 11th. Loaiza held down the Red Sox until the 14th, when he walked two and gave up Ortiz's hit.

"I just stayed low and away," Loaiza said. "When I came up on him a little bit, he got a base hit. But it was a great pitch."

The night was filled with clutch pitches, a surprise considering how taxed the bullpens had been the night before. Martínez and Mike Mussina both pitched six effective innings, and of the 12 relievers, only Tom Gordon and Loaiza gave up any runs.

"I can't fault any of them," Yankees pitching coach Mel Stottlemyre said. "We held them for a long time, and they held us for a long time."

Gordon got a double-play grounder from Manny Ramirez to end the seventh, but Ortiz homered to lead off the eighth, cutting the Yankees' lead to 4-3. A walk and a single put runners at first and third, and Manager Joe Torre called for Rivera.

It was almost an impossible situation for Rivera, and he could not avoid a blown save. Varitek hit a sacrifice fly to center, tying the score, 4-4. It was Rivera's third blown save in five chances this postseason; he had converted 30 of 32 before this year.

After the tie, both teams missed several opportunities. The Yankees might have scored in the ninth off Keith Foulke, but Tony Clark's two-out hit bounced into the right field stands for a ground-rule double, holding Ruben Sierra at third base.

The Red Sox ran themselves out of two rallies. Yankees catcher Jorge Posada cut down Damon at second on a stolen-base attempt in the ninth, and nailed Ortiz in the 12th after Doug Mientkiewicz missed a hit-and-run sign.

In between were two other scoring opportunities the Yankees stifled. Gary Sheffield misread Mientkiewicz's fly ball in the 10th, which went for a one-out double. Quantrill survived that jam, and Loaiza saved the Yankees in the 11th, getting a double-play grounder from Orlando Cabrera after Damon's failed bunt.

On and on it went, with rarely an easy inning going by. The teams had base runners in 8 of 11 half-innings before the winning rally.

"We have a lot of intensity on both sides of this thing, and it takes on a life of its own," Torre said. "Each game is a series in itself. These last two games have proven that. These ball clubs both want it badly."

The Yankees have not won a championship in three years, which might as well be a century for George Steinbrenner, the impatient principal owner. The Red Sox have not won since 1918, and history is squarely against them.

No team in baseball has ever recovered from a 3-0 deficit to win a best-of-seven series. But then again, only two other teams have even forced a Game 6. The Red Sox have made it that far, and they want more.

"We have a chance to shock the United States of America," first baseman Kevin Millar said. "There's no pressure. We have a chance to do something no one's ever done, to be down 0-3 and win a seven-game series. Here we are, we're battling our butts for Game 6 with Curt Schilling on the mound. It's an amazing series to be a part of. That's what this rivalry's all about."

INSIDE PITCH

The Yankees have not thought about which pitcher might start a potential Game 7. "I would be real stupid if I was planning for Game 7," the pitching coach Mel Stottlemyre said. ... Boston's Manny Ramirez has gone five games without a run batted in for the first time all season. ... Yankees reliever Paul Quantrill said he would be available on Tuesday.

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company
Simply Joel
 
Posts: 3483
Joined: Wed Mar 31, 2004 10:08 am
Location: Land of Lincoln

Postby cowboyangel » Tue Oct 19, 2004 3:40 pm

I'm not ...I'm only stating the reality that I call forth now!
"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believe is false."- William Casey, CIA Director 1981
User avatar
cowboyangel
 
Posts: 6987
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 10:32 pm

Postby cowboyangel » Tue Oct 19, 2004 9:44 pm

cowboyangel wrote:
cowboyangel wrote:Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image



......8x



we are watching baseball history being made!
Love, Cowboyangel
"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believe is false."- William Casey, CIA Director 1981
User avatar
cowboyangel
 
Posts: 6987
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 10:32 pm

Postby Simply Joel » Wed Oct 20, 2004 5:37 am

Congrats Boston and CA....

i imagine you fell asleep deaming of the world series (please see previous comments herein)... best of luck.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

October 20, 2004
SERIES TIED, 3-3
Schilling and Nail-Biting: Red Sox Win Game 6
By TYLER KEPNER

The Yankees are one loss from sinking to an inglorious place in baseball history. Their fans beat them to it last night.

A controversial call in the eighth inning of Game 6 of the American League Championship Series negated a Yankees run and brought bedlam to Yankee Stadium. The Boston Red Sox won, 4-2, and for part of the ninth inning, dozens of police officers in riot gear kneeled along the walls down the left- and right-field lines.

With a chance to knock off the Red Sox and clinch their 40th pennant, the Yankees barely put up a fight. They managed only four hits and a run in seven innings against Curt Schilling, and now must play a Game 7 that had never seemed possible.

On Sunday night, the Yankees were three outs from sweeping the Red Sox. Now, the series is tied. Until last night, no team in baseball history had recovered from a 3-0 deficit to pull even in a best-of-seven series. The Red Sox have done that, and now they will meet the Yankees tonight with a World Series berth on the line.

The Yankees rallied in the eighth off Bronson Arroyo, who replaced Schilling to start the inning. He struck out Tony Clark, and a victory was five outs away. It was at this point last year that Pedro Martínez failed to hold a three-run lead, and the Yankees came back to win the pennant in Game 7.

With his own three-run lead to protect, Arroyo gave up a double to Miguel Cairo and a single to Derek Jeter. It was 4-2, and Alex Rodriguez came up. Rodriguez, anemic all season in clutch situations, grounded weakly down the first-base line.

Arroyo and the first baseman, Doug Mientkiewicz, came in for it. Arroyo grabbed it and scrambled after Rodriguez. He switched the ball from his bare hand to his glove, but it was a tenuous hold. As Arroyo applied the tag, Rodriguez raised his left arm and hacked the ball out of the glove, essentially forcing a fumble. The ball scooted down the right-field line and Jeter barreled in from first, seemingly bringing the Yankees within a run. The stadium pulsated, but the Red Sox howled. When the umpires gathered and reversed the call, it was instant chaos.

Manager Joe Torre stormed from the dugout and the upper deck exploded, with baseballs and water bottles crashing onto the grass. Bob Sheppard, the stately public address announcer, pleaded with the fans to stop. They ignored him.

It took 15 stadium workers to clear the mess, as Rodriguez argued with the umpires and Arroyo - the pitcher who plunked him in July, inciting a brawl - tossed with the infielders.

When order was restored, he got Gary Sheffield to pop out, ending the inning. To be sure, a Major League Baseball security official directed nearly 40 helmeted police officers onto the field during a pitching change in the top of the ninth.

Coming into the game, the Yankees and the Red Sox had met 50 times since the start of the 2003 season, with each team winning 25 games. The difference in runs scored between the teams? Two.

The Boston marathons - Games 4 and 5 took a combined 26 innings and nearly 11 hours - depleted the bullpens of both teams, making it imperative for the starters to work deep into the game. In Jon Lieber, the Yankees seemed to have the perfect candidate.

Schilling set down the first eight Yankees, his fastball reaching 94 miles an hour. His third pitch of the game was a 92 m.p.h. fastball, directed at the helmet of Rodriguez. It spun Rodriguez back and off the plate, and he eventually broke his bat on a line out.

Jorge Posada's fly to right died at the wall in the second inning, Schilling arching his back until Trot Nixon made the catch. He was perfect through eight batters, until Cairo doubled off the warning track in left-center. But that scoring chance vanished when Jeter flied out.

After failing to score in the second inning, the same Red Sox hitters tried again in the fourth. With two outs, Kevin Millar doubled into the left-field corner, hustling for second after shuffling out of the box. Varitek hit next, working an at-bat similar to Damon's in the first.

Two called strikes, then a full count, with foul fouls mixed in. On the 10th pitch, Varitek stroked a single to center, scoring Millar with the game's first run. Orlando Cabrera wasted no time, lining the first pitch into left field for another single.

Again, Bellhorn came up with a chance for redemption. To that point, his series had been a disaster: 3 hits, 21 at-bats, 10 strikeouts, no runs batted in. It was all about to change.

On a 1-2 count - after two fouls - Bellhorn lifted an opposite-field fly to left field. It carried into the stands, bounced off the chest of a fan in the front row, and bounded back to the playing field. Left fielder Hideki Matsui stopped chasing it, knowing it was a homer. But Jim Joyce, an umpire assigned specifically to left field, blew the call.

Joyce called the ball in play, and Bellhorn stopped at second. But the Red Sox argued, the umpires conferred and the call was reversed. Bellhorn had a three-run homer.

"It was coming right to me and I missed it," Michael Appelbaum, a fan from Manhattan, said.

He attended the game with his 12-year-old daughter, Mia. "I wanted to give her the ball," Appelbaum said. "No matter how you try to make it, it was a home run."

The Yankees, who argued briefly, trailed by 4-0. It was their biggest deficit at any point in the series, and they seemed powerless to change it against Schilling. Even when the Yankees got a break, they could not take advantage.

They had two breaks in the middle innings, both on misplays by third baseman Bill Mueller. After Rodriguez singled to center to lead off the fourth, Mueller mishandled Sheffield's grounder, which went for a single.

But Matsui, who has gone cold after a fast start this series, popped out. Then Bernie Williams grounded sharply to Millar's backhand at first base, and Schilling covered the bag, bum ankle and all.

When Posada grounded out to end the inning, the Yankees had squandered three chances with a runner in scoring position. They were 1 for 13 in that situation in Game 5.

The first batter of the Yankees' fifth, Ruben Sierra, flicked a foul pop that dropped between Mueller and Varitek. He could not capitalize on his new life, striking out for the second time. Schilling retired the side that inning, and again in the sixth.

Matsui bounced out to lead off the seventh, but Schilling fell behind Williams, 3-0. After a strike, Williams hit a pitch down the right-field line, inside the foul pole in the third deck.

The home run cut Boston's lead to 4-1, but Posada popped out and Sierra struck out. It was another quiet inning for the Yankees, a team suddenly on the edge.

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company
Simply Joel
 
Posts: 3483
Joined: Wed Mar 31, 2004 10:08 am
Location: Land of Lincoln

Postby DVD Burner » Wed Oct 20, 2004 9:02 pm

Did the Red sox just win? :shock:
Image

"The art is in the digit!"

The Original Digiman
User avatar
DVD Burner
 
Posts: 9741
Joined: Fri Dec 12, 2003 4:09 am

Postby cowboyangel » Wed Oct 20, 2004 9:49 pm

cowboyangel wrote:
cowboyangel wrote:
cowboyangel wrote:Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image



......8x



we are watching baseball history being made!
Love, Cowboyangel


YES YES YES YES YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

http://www.brightpathvideo.com/flash/204firew.mov"
"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believe is false."- William Casey, CIA Director 1981
User avatar
cowboyangel
 
Posts: 6987
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 10:32 pm

Postby cowboyangel » Wed Oct 20, 2004 9:50 pm

cowboyangel wrote:
cowboyangel wrote:
cowboyangel wrote:
cowboyangel wrote:Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image



......8x



we are watching baseball history being made!
Love, Cowboyangel


YES YES YES YES YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

http://www.brightpathvideo.com/flash/2004firew.mov"



oops
"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believe is false."- William Casey, CIA Director 1981
User avatar
cowboyangel
 
Posts: 6987
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 10:32 pm

Postby cowboyangel » Wed Oct 20, 2004 10:12 pm

hey, I thought I'd copy this over from the bar thread........

The Red Sox created baseball history today, by being the first team in the entire history of the sport to come from a 3-0 deficit to win in a best of seven series for the honor of playing the winner of the National League penant in the 2004 World Series. More than historic for baseball, this event is larger in the sense of its unknown positive impacts on many thousands of youths in this country, and anyone else who may be profoundly moved and inspired by this against the odds come from defeat to victory effort. It's bigger than baseball now, and that's the real differnce.

Amen, cowboyangel Oct 20, 2004
"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believe is false."- William Casey, CIA Director 1981
User avatar
cowboyangel
 
Posts: 6987
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 10:32 pm

baseball is dead

Postby Simply Joel » Thu Oct 21, 2004 6:09 am

congrats, Boston and CA...

too funny, now i have so much more time to jack CA up about baseball... a sport that will soon join ranks of latin.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

October 21, 2004
BOSTON WINS SERIES, 4-3
Red Sox' Anguish and Yankees' Mystique Dissolve in Game 7
By TYLER KEPNER

They had been reliable caretakers of a cosmic curse, feasting for decades on the gift that kept on giving: Babe Ruth, purchased from the Boston Red Sox in 1920, and all the championship karma he brought with him.

The rules were very simple. The Yankees won and their rivals lost, often painfully, eternal justice for the worst trade in baseball history. The Red Sox still have not won a World Series in 86 years. But they got there last night, playing the Babe's game in the house that he built.

With a barrage of four home runs - all pulled into the right-field seats, where Ruth once took aim - the Red Sox eliminated the Yankees with a 10-3 victory in Game 7 of the American League Championship Series at Yankee Stadium.

The Red Sox became the first team in baseball history to win a best-of-seven series after losing the first three games, and they will play host to the Houston Astros or the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 1 of the World Series at Fenway Park on Saturday. The National League Championship Series is tied, three games apiece, with Game 7 tonight.

For the Yankees, whose $180 million payroll is the highest ever for a baseball team, it was a devastating failure. They had beaten the Red Sox in Game 7 of last October's A.L.C.S., rallying from a three-run deficit to capture an 11-inning thriller. Both teams reloaded in the off-season, and a rematch seemed inevitable.

In Game 4 on Sunday, the Yankees were three outs from a sweep. But Boston came back to win consecutive extra-inning showdowns, then stifled the Yankees behind Curt Schilling on Tuesday.

Last night, Derek Lowe was the pitching star, allowing one hit over six innings despite pitching on two days' rest. And Johnny Damon, the shaggy-haired leadoff man batting .103 through the first six games, slammed two homers and drove in six runs.

The Yankees had done their best to channel their ghosts. Bucky Dent, who homered to slay the Red Sox in 1978, threw the ceremonial first pitch to Yogi Berra. The game was played on Mickey Mantle's birthday. George Steinbrenner, the impatient principal owner, showed up in the clubhouse some six hours before the first pitch, apparently spreading good cheer.

"He was very supportive," Manager Joe Torre said.

The good feelings undoubtedly have passed. Steinbrenner will probably order a reconstruction of the team, which won 101 games during the regular season but folded when it mattered most.

Steinbrenner could pursue Boston's Pedro Martínez, the pending free agent whose relief appearance brought the Yankees their only bit of hope last night.

Martínez took over for the top of the seventh inning with the Red Sox leading by 8-1. The Yankees were trying to pull off the second-biggest comeback in postseason history; in 1929, the Philadelphia A's won Game 4 of the World Series after trailing the Chicago Cubs by eight runs.

The Yankees seemed capable of their own heroics. As the fans screamed, "Who's your daddy?" at Martínez, the Yankees mounted a rally. Hideki Matsui and Bernie Williams started the inning with doubles, and Kenny Lofton singled in a run.

But with the lead cut to 8-3, Martínez fanned pinch-hitter John Olerud with his hardest pitch, a 95-mile-an-hour fastball. A flyout by Miguel Cairo ended the excitement, and Mike Timlin came on for the eighth.

Pinch-hitter Ruben Sierra grounded out to second base with men on first and second for the final out.

The Yankees had not lost four games in a row since April; Boston won three of the games in that streak. To some, including catcher Jorge Posada and Torre, the Yankees seemed tight on their way to Game 7.

"There's no question there's tension," Torre said.

After Game 4, Torre and several players spoke confidently, reminding themselves that they were still in control. But one loss followed another, and before last night's game, Torre told his players the obvious: "We have a game to win today."

For that, they turned to Kevin Brown, a veteran mercenary brought in last winter to replace Roger Clemens and unload Jeff Weaver's contract. But Brown never endeared himself to teammates during the season, and he was hammered in Game 3 at Fenway Park.

Brown came out throwing hard, his second pitch a called strike at 94 miles an hour. But Damon singled to left, past third baseman Alex Rodriguez, and he stole second.

Manny Ramirez hit a low line drive under the glove of shortstop Derek Jeter. Damon took a step back to second, unsure if Jeter would catch it, and took off when it went through. Hideki Matsui made a sidearm relay throw to Jeter, who fired home.

Posada had the plate blocked, and the stadium shook when he tagged out Damon. If the Yankees had momentum, Brown could not sustain it. Ortiz ripped his first pitch into the right-field stands for a two-run homer. Ramirez raised his fist as he rounded second on his trot.

Torre could sense trouble three batters into the second inning. With Brown on his way to walking Bill Mueller, Javier Vazquez got loose in the bullpen. After the Mueller walk, the pitching coach Mel Stottlemyre visited the mound. Then Brown walked the No. 9 hitter, Orlando Cabrera.

Torre emerged from the dugout, and when he took the ball from Brown, he did not even pat him on the back. It is the surest sign of Torre's displeasure. Spike Lee stood and cheered for Brown from his seat behind the Yankees' dugout, but almost everyone else booed as he stalked off the field.

They could not have known how quickly the game would turn, though history might have told them. Vazquez had given up two homers to Damon - one on the second pitch, the other on the first - in a game in June. Posada set up outside and Vazquez threw inside, a danger zone to a left-handed hitter at Yankee Stadium with the bases loaded.

Damon lifted the pitch in the air. It would have been a flyout almost anywhere else, but the ball carried into the first row of seats for a grand slam. One pitch, four runs, and the Yankees were down by 6-0.

Instantly, it was obvious: this would either be a Red Sox triumph, or the most devastating loss in their history. They kept after Vazquez, determined to make it the former.

Vazquez helped them with a leadoff walk to Cabrera in the fourth. Up came Damon, and his next hit went a little farther than his first.

Hacking at another first pitch, Damon buried a two-run homer into the third deck in right field. A fan in a Red Sox cap ended up with the ball, delighted with his souvenir and his team's 8-1 lead.

Vazquez walked two of the next three hitters, and Torre replaced him with Esteban Loaiza. Vazquez - the pitcher imported to replace Andy Pettitte - had walked five, allowed two homers and gotten only six outs.

Brown? Vazquez? Loaiza? Hitters like Kenny Lofton dribbling weak ground balls off Lowe? The fans might have wondered what happened to their Yankees. Even before the game, Torre said that he was looking for the team that won 101 games in the regular season.

Lowe was happy to take the charity. Facing a tired pitcher and needing base runners, the Yankees swung away. After Damon's grand slam, Matsui grounded out on a 2-0 pitch, and Bernie Williams did the same on a 1-0 pitch.

Through five innings, Lowe allowed one hit - a run-scoring single by Jeter - and threw only 59 pitches. He had to face the top of the order in the sixth, and it did not faze him.

Lowe used 10 pitches, getting harmless groundouts from Jeter and Rodriguez and a strikeout from Gary Sheffield. Lowe spun around and posed on the mound, pumping his fist and holding it in front of him - once, then twice.

It was actually happening. The nerd was kissing the homecoming queen. Paper was beating scissors; scissors were beating rock. Charlie Brown was kicking the football. The Red Sox were beating the Yankees for the American League pennant.


Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company
Simply Joel
 
Posts: 3483
Joined: Wed Mar 31, 2004 10:08 am
Location: Land of Lincoln

Postby cowboyangel » Thu Oct 21, 2004 4:35 pm

et tu Brute?
"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believe is false."- William Casey, CIA Director 1981
User avatar
cowboyangel
 
Posts: 6987
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 10:32 pm

funny story

Postby emily sparkle » Thu Oct 21, 2004 6:57 pm

so... i never watch sports. haven't watched a lick of baseball this season. my boyfriend and i simply have no interest in it.

last night, we get goaded into turning on the set by a yankees-fan-friend.

just as we switch on the set and settle in to watch from the 8th inning on, a guy RUNS by our house with a megaphone yelling "GO SOX".

it was *almost* a playa moment.

:)
:) emily sparkle
eplaya administrator
___

mobilize, energize, motivate, INSPIRE ordinary people to do things to improve their quality of life.
- nobel peace prize winner, wangari maathai
User avatar
emily sparkle
 
Posts: 899
Joined: Fri Jul 11, 2003 4:50 am
Location: the happy valley, ma

Postby cowboyangel » Thu Oct 21, 2004 7:30 pm

see!
"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believe is false."- William Casey, CIA Director 1981
User avatar
cowboyangel
 
Posts: 6987
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 10:32 pm

I loved it.

Postby rosebud » Fri Oct 22, 2004 7:13 am

As a Cubs fan......
Just fishing. OK, I'm tired of just fishing. Last night I was dreaming that I was fishing. I could never get to the right spot. I kept moving around. TIME TO CATCH SOMETHING.
User avatar
rosebud
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2004 8:49 am
Location: Chicago, Chicago

Postby Apollonaris Zeus » Sat Oct 23, 2004 12:33 pm

There was never a curse. Do you think that Babe Ruth would care. He made more money in NY (which is why every player wants to go to NY and the major endorsements available outsite of his contract) He became famous because they built a stadium to his form of hitting. The Babe is above the Curse.

But the Red Sox's Fan is another story.

On the night of the Series Win these hooligans set fire to a car visiting from NY, trashed local businesses and started fights with anyone that looked them in the eye! They are in every terms like England soccer fans.
They have a reputation, from every visiting team, of being the fans with the poorest sense of Sportmanship and they have no respect for the teams that have better them for almost a century.

The Red Soxs have lost October series consistantly because the fans don't deserve it.

But the team does deserve it and I think they are miles above the fans.

This Yankee has always loved the Red Soxs and I'm supporting them because they are great players past and present.


Death of a Red Sox Fan Leads to Stricter Rules
By PAM BELLUCK and KATIE ZEZIMA

Published: October 23, 2004


OSTON, Oct. 22 - In the wake of the death of a Red Sox fan hit by a police pepper-spray weapon after the team's playoff victory, Boston officials are imposing restrictions on the bars around Fenway Park and are considering discontinuing use of the pepper-spray gun.

The Red Sox' historic victory over the Yankees Wednesday night sent as many as 80,000 people streaming out of bars and homes into the streets around Fenway Park after midnight, many of whom climbed on cars and lampposts and swung from trees.

Advertisement


As the crowd grew unruly, a police officer fired the pepper-spray weapon, striking 21-year-old Victoria Snelgrove, a college student, in the eye, which caused her death several hours later. Police Commissioner Kathleen O'Toole said the department took responsibility for the death, and was investigating the incident.

Hoping to curb raucous behavior, Mayor Thomas M. Menino said Friday that during the World Series, which begins here Saturday night, bars around the baseball stadium would be monitored closely to make sure they do not allow in too many patrons or allow people to drink too much.

The mayor also said that when bars reach their legal capacity of patrons, other people will be turned away and not allowed to linger or line up outside. Television cameras will also be banned from filming inside the bars because officials believe that the cameras incite patrons to show off and act rowdier.

Mr. Menino had originally threatened to keep Fenway-area bars from serving alcohol during the World Series. But on Friday, Mr. Menino said he had met with bar owners who were angered by the threat. He said he had agreed to allow them to serve drinks if they abided by the other restrictions.

The mayor also said that more police officers would be stationed inside bars and near tourist areas. He said the measures were "part of what we're trying to do to make sure the world sees Boston in a positive manner.''

In addition, Commissioner O'Toole said Friday afternoon that she would meet with the department's tactical commanders and consider whether to stop using the pepper-spray weapon, which is a paintball-like gun that fires plastic balls filled with a variant of cayenne pepper.

At least one expert, Melvin L. Tucker, a criminal justice and security consultant from Morristown, Tenn., who is a former police chief, said that the pepper-spray guns are "less than lethal" weapons designed to be fired at the ground or at a person's chest or lower, so that the plastic balls will break open and send a cloud of pepper spray into a person's face, causing burning and stinging that should stop the person's actions but should not kill.

"It's a real tragedy, which means either that the equipment was used not in accordance to training or the manufacturer's recommendation or it was inaccurate in the way it was fired," said Mr. Tucker, who said he did not know of any other deaths caused by the weapon. "The protocol is you don't shoot if you're going to hit the person in the head or neck area because that can be lethal, as it was in this case."

The death of Ms. Snelgrove, a journalism student at Emerson College, has cast a cloud on the euphoria over the Red Sox victory and prompted some people to accuse the police of overreacting in trying to control the crowds.

Danielle Kotzias, 22, a classmate of Ms. Snelgrove, said, "The people who were supposed to protect us in that crowd, the police, used quote-unquote nonlethal weapons - those nonlethal weapons killed my friend.''

The weapons were bought by the police department for the Democratic National Convention this summer but were not used then.

Commissioner O'Toole said that police officers used "great restraint" in trying to control the crowd after Wednesday's game. She said they decided to use the pepper-spray gun after some fans started throwing bottles and lighting fires in the street.

"We maintained our cool until the fires started and the vandalism started and people threw projectiles at police and others in the crowd," she said. "We considered this option better than nightsticks and clubs."

The commissioner added: "We want to use the least force necessary in order to maintain the crowd. Very unfortunately, it resulted in a horrible action.''

Tension over the death seemed to grow on Friday, in part because The Boston Herald published a graphic front-page photograph of Ms. Snelling bleeding in the street and an even starker picture inside the paper. Outraged readers flooded the newspaper's phone lines and Web site with complaints, calling the photographs tasteless, inflammatory and offensive.

Kenneth A. Chandler, The Herald's editorial director, issued an apologetic statement, saying "our aim was to demonstrate this terrible tragedy as comprehensively as possible. In retrospect, the images of this unusually ugly incident were too graphic."

On Friday, bar owners said they were committed to enforcing the new rules.

"We're intent on having a good, safe environment in licensed establishments during the series," said Patrick Lyons, who owns several bars and nightclubs near the stadium.

But Mayor Menino and other officials also emphasized on Friday that students at the city's numerous colleges, who made up the majority of the Wednesday-night crowd, should exercise restraint and responsibility during the World Series. The mayor met with student representatives on Thursday, and several Red Sox players made public service television announcements that asked fans to temper their enthusiasm with self-control.

"We can't do it alone," Commissioner O'Toole said. "We need members of the community, particularly kids, to step up the responsibility. I appeal to them, let's learn from this tragedy."

End of article.

The best team and the greatist team has and always be the Yankees. They were the best team this year- the 19 to 8 score is the proof of it.
But there were forces out there that shifted the power to the Sox because they like the Sox team.

The Sox are going to the World Series irregardless of its arrogant fans.

I know because Ted is there supporting them along with the Babe and Ms. Snelgrove!

So will I!

A II Z

PS- and I want the Boston fans to finnaly shut the fuck up and show some respect to visiting teams especially the Yankees because will be back next year!
User avatar
Apollonaris Zeus
 
Posts: 3716
Joined: Sun Sep 14, 2003 11:17 am

Postby cowboyangel » Sat Oct 23, 2004 4:08 pm

OFF TO THE CHURCH OF BELIEF!!!!!!!
"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believe is false."- William Casey, CIA Director 1981
User avatar
cowboyangel
 
Posts: 6987
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 10:32 pm

Postby cowboyangel » Sun Oct 24, 2004 12:21 am

Zeus..this Red Sox fan abhors violent fan behavior anywhere, NY is no exception, never have so many riot police been called into a game as that at Yankee stadium for game 7 on Oct 20. Consider that please in your assestment. Most fans on both sides are well behaved, it's always the few nutty ones who stand out.If New York happens to show up in next year's penant race, well then, we'll just beat them again....
"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believe is false."- William Casey, CIA Director 1981
User avatar
cowboyangel
 
Posts: 6987
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 10:32 pm

Postby cowboyangel » Sun Oct 24, 2004 12:25 am

ahhh why not, one more thing..rooting for the Yankees is like rooting for Morgan Stanley or Chase Manhattan or the Federal Reserve...like Yea Federal Reserve! Let's go out there Fed Reserve..Fed Reserve Yeah!
see what I mean? No? oh well.....
"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believe is false."- William Casey, CIA Director 1981
User avatar
cowboyangel
 
Posts: 6987
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 10:32 pm

Postby Simply Joel » Sun Oct 24, 2004 6:07 am

would somebody give me hand pulling CA from the ceiling?
Simply Joel
 
Posts: 3483
Joined: Wed Mar 31, 2004 10:08 am
Location: Land of Lincoln

Postby cowboyangel » Sun Oct 24, 2004 11:18 am

ahhhh it's a Red Sox kinda day today
"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believe is false."- William Casey, CIA Director 1981
User avatar
cowboyangel
 
Posts: 6987
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 10:32 pm

You wanna talk fans?

Postby Driveway » Sun Oct 24, 2004 3:04 pm

The Boston Red Sox completed the greatest comeback in baseball. They overcame a 3-0 deficit for the first time, not only making history, but doing it against the New York Yankees. The most successful franchise in the Majors and THE nemesis of the Red Sox.

We all know about the "Curse of the Bambino". The Red Sox have not won a World Series since selling Babe Ruth to the Yankees in 1918, nor have they defeated the Yankees in any playoff series.

Overcoming the massive psychological hurdles of a 3-0 deficit, not to mention the Curse (so far anyways) is a huge acheivement. And how do Bostonians repay them?
A paltry 80 000 people on the streets of Boston.

That's it? For the defeat of the hated Yankees? 80k?

Calagary, Alberta had one hundred and thirty thousand people on the steet for the Flames when they were going for the Stanley Cup. Fifty thousand more than Boston could muster for their beloved Sox.

Best baseball fans? Maybe.

But of course, baseball isn't a sport.
User avatar
Driveway
 
Posts: 66
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2003 5:40 pm
Location: a gene pool near you

PreviousNext

Return to Open Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: AntiM, FaeTora and 6 guests