Where the fuck does this go?

All things outside of Burning Man.

Postby C.f.M. » Sat Oct 10, 2009 6:41 am

ygmir wrote:that may depend on whether you're friends with Eddy Gein................


He's a lousy cook.

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Postby ygmir » Sat Oct 10, 2009 6:45 am

C.f.M. wrote:
ygmir wrote:that may depend on whether you're friends with Eddy Gein................


He's a lousy cook.

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but, a great tailor.........
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Postby C.f.M. » Sat Oct 10, 2009 6:59 am

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Postby ygmir » Sat Oct 10, 2009 7:08 am

well, sort of............
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Postby theCryptofishist » Sat Oct 10, 2009 7:36 pm

Does Martin Denny have a point?
The Lady with a Lamprey

"The powerful are exploiting people, art and ideas, and this leads to us plebes debating how to best ration ice.
Man, no wonder they always win....." Lonesomebri


Get a Taint, you pathetic cur!
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Postby gyre » Sun Oct 11, 2009 12:52 am

I thought these were too good to miss.
From the Israel thread, in case you didn't read all 535 posts.
Who knew jews could be funny?

Simon said
here, let me inflict some humor into this otherwise lacking of funny thread.

i know, it's a curse, a stain, a blemish even that i use the one weapon that jews hold superiority in.

bad jokes.


here is a list of Cohans for you to learn and meditate on, especially if you are that particular west coast flavor called jewBu or Jewish buddhist.


If there is no self, whose arthritis is this?

Be here now.
Be someplace else later.
Is that so complicated?

Drink tea and nourish life;
with the first sip, joy;
with the second sip, satisfaction;
with the third sip, peace;
with the fourth, a Danish.

Wherever you go, there you are.
Your luggage is another story.

Accept misfortune as a blessing.
Do not wish for perfect health, or a life without
problems.
What would you talk about?

The journey of a thousand miles begins with a
single Oy.

There is no escaping karma.
In a previous life,
you never called,
you never wrote,
you never visited.
And whose fault was that?

Zen is not easy.
It takes effort to attain nothingness.
And then what do you have?
Bupkis.

The Tao does not speak.
The Tao does not blame.
The Tao does not take sides.
The Tao has no expectations.
TheTao demands nothing of others.
The Tao is not Jewish.

Breathe in.
Breathe out.
Breathe in.
Breathe out.
Forget this and attaining Enlightenment will be the
least of your problems.

Let your mind be as a floating cloud.
Let your stillness be as a wooded glen.
And sit up straight.
You'll never meet the Buddha with such rounded
shoulders.

Deep inside you are ten thousand flowers.
Each flower blossoms ten thousand times.
Each blossom has ten thousand petals.
You might want to see a specialist.

Be aware of your body.
Be aware of your perceptions.
Keep in mind that not every physical sensation is a
symptom of a terminal illness.

The Torah says,
Love your neighbor as yourself.
The Buddha says,
There is no self.
So, maybe we're off the hook.




there, don't you feel better now?
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Postby can't sit still » Sun Oct 11, 2009 6:29 pm

I don't post things because I believe that they are the absolute truth. I post them because I believe that they should be considered.
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Postby gyre » Tue Oct 13, 2009 2:08 am

I used to sleep like this.


Man sleeps through fire that destroys Ross home
Monday, October 12, 2009
By Paula Reed Ward, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
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A Ross man whose home caught on fire and partially collapsed early yesterday morning slept through the entire ordeal, only to be awakened when firefighters were doing a walk-through of the home 2 1/2 hours later.

"Never would I have expected anybody to live," Ross fire Marshal John Reubi said. "I was flabbergasted."

The blaze at 135 Buckhill Road was reported at 2:40 a.m. by a passer-by, and by the time firefighters arrived, the large farmhouse was fully involved.

Firefighters made repeated attempts to get into the home to search for victims, but were unable to because part of the roof collapsed.

About two hours after it was reported, the blaze was under control. Two firefighters were then sent in to determine if the building was structurally sound, Mr. Reubi said.

When they kicked in the door to a small corner bedroom on the first floor -- at the opposite end of the home from where the fire started -- a man slid off his mattress.

"It startled the firefighter," Mr. Reubi said. "As they got closer, they could hear moaning."

Then, he continued, "The guy yelled, 'What are you doing breaking my windows?' "

"It was as if he didn't even know it was going on," Mr. Reubi said. "He had no knowledge of it."

The man was identified as Edward Stefanic. Because the room he was in was mostly closed off from the rest of the house, it appeared that he was mostly protected from the worst of the smoke and fire.

Mr. Stefanic had no burns, though he did have raised carbon monoxide levels, Mr. Reubi said. He was taken to UPMC Mercy where he was in critical condition last night.

Although no cause has yet been determined, Mr. Reubi believes it is likely that the fire was accidental. It started in the kitchen, he said.

Mr. Stefanic was home alone at the time of the blaze. Earlier on Saturday evening, emergency medical personnel were called to the house to take his mother to the hospital when she was having chest pains, Mr. Reubi said.

No one else was home at the time of the blaze. A dog survived, though a cat did not.

Paula Reed Ward can be reached at pward@post-gazette.com.



http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/09285/1004841-54.stm
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Hello Shiva, the vengeance goddess of Hello Kittycats

Postby gyre » Thu Oct 15, 2009 5:12 pm

Hello Shiva, the many armed vengeance goddess of Hello Kittycats

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How Barbie Death Camp Started

Postby gyre » Sat Oct 17, 2009 8:51 pm

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Postby gyre » Sun Oct 18, 2009 11:53 am

November 8, 2003
The machine that leaves you no place to hide
The latest scanner will reveal your deadliest secrets
By Nigel Hawkes and Oliver Wright

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TECHNOLOGY developed to make helicopter flights safer lies at the heart of the police’s new drive against gun crime.

The passive millimetre-wave imager (PMWI) is able to detect the electromagnetic waves emitted from the human body and other objects.

Clothes emit almost no waves and so effectively disappear when they are scanned.

Unlike a metal detector, the camera can detect any hard object. A knife with a ceramic blade would show up, as would a gun made from plastics.

The camera operates rapidly enough to produce real-time images, so people and vehicles can be scanned without being stopped.

The technology was born as a way of enabling helicopters to operate in very low visibility, but the equipment proved to be too heavy, so this application was abandoned.

Since the September 11, 2001, attacks in America the idea has had increasing appeal for use as a security device and is being marketed to police by the firm QinetiQ, which was part of the Ministry of Defence before it was privatised.

Its system is about 3ft (1m) square and can pick up radiation from people and objects up to 6ft away and project it as a clear image on screen.

One version, called Borderwatch, which needs a van to carry it, has been used by Eurotunnel and the Immigration Service to try to catch illegal immigrants hiding in the backs of lorries.

“It has already detected thousands of them,â€
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Postby can't sit still » Sun Oct 18, 2009 4:00 pm

gyre, that is absolutely amazing !!! It's essentially a "life detector" Imagine the applications in medicine. It could probably scan for anomalies in the body,,, like tumors or necrosis. It would avoid the ionizing radiation of X-rays. If it will scan at 8 feet, it could be used to search for people trapped in cave-ins. It could probably scan individual biometrics and be used for identification. The possibilities are endless.
I don't post things because I believe that they are the absolute truth. I post them because I believe that they should be considered.
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Postby theCryptofishist » Sun Oct 18, 2009 4:02 pm

Imagine what that could do for history or archeology. Being able to look into walls, we could find all the Priest's Holes and learn who was secretly Catholic in Tudor and Stuart England. I wonder if it could see fossils within the stone. Maybe not, maybe it wouldn't register as denser or whatever it is. Ha! It could find buried moop!

Of course, the military has lots more money than archeologists, but the technology is in some ways "neutral." We make the choices on how to use it.
The Lady with a Lamprey

"The powerful are exploiting people, art and ideas, and this leads to us plebes debating how to best ration ice.
Man, no wonder they always win....." Lonesomebri


Get a Taint, you pathetic cur!
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Postby Deb Prothero » Sun Oct 18, 2009 4:10 pm

theCryptofishist wrote:We make the choices on how to use it.


As per usual, Crypto nails it. Too bad it's the police who have this first instead of medical or other worthwhile uses.
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Postby can't sit still » Sun Oct 18, 2009 4:26 pm

I hate to point out the not-so-obvious but, if science gets real good at detecting life energy, how long will it be before it can suppress these energies? Imagine a projected energy weapon that can "burn out" any source that produces energy at a certain wavelength. That isn't at all far-fetched if you understand the relationship between scalar energy and the double helix of DNA. :(
I don't post things because I believe that they are the absolute truth. I post them because I believe that they should be considered.
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Postby Oldguy » Sun Oct 18, 2009 4:42 pm

I remember that movie called "Scanners". Sort of like "Men who stare at goats". Instead of fainting or seizures, their head would explode. We have infared scanners that firemen and police use. When Juan Corona killed all those farmworkers about 4 miles from here, the U2's from Beale Airforce base used scanners to find the graves by temperature variation. Heat is just a setting on the electromagnitic force/ radiation/ frequecy spectrum. Even cell division is partially an electromechanical function, microtubial formation prior to mitosis or meiosis, I forget...Brainwaves, Kirilean forces, animal magnatism...
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Burning Man is an exercise—indeed, a challenge—in balancing cooperation, self-reliance, individual expression, and creative collaboration in the formation of an artistic community. E. Britannica
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ETD

Postby gyre » Sun Oct 18, 2009 5:07 pm

There is still some contention about what life is and when it ends, and how.

http://www.deathreference.com/Me-Nu/Mom ... Death.html


MOMENT OF DEATH

Is there a moment of death? Millions of death certificates provide abundant evidence—or do they? Many world religions also envision an awesome moment in which the soul departs from the body to continue its existence in another form. Furthermore, the moment of death is the signal for an abrupt change in society's way of dealing with the individual: Medical attention gives way to mortuary services and rites of passage; the death is announced through formal and informal channels; personal records are reclassified; the deceased person's assets are redistributed (or become the subject of conflict and litigation); and there is additional tension in situations such as organ donation and cryonic suspension. In each of these scenarios there is often a sense of urgency to move on to the next step whether this be the removal of organs to save another person's life or the preparation for cryostasis. The moment of death, then, has both symbolic resonations and practical consequences. Nevertheless, despite the definitions, assumptions, and beliefs that surround it, the moment of death can be quite an elusive concept.


Is There a Final Moment of Life?

The most common assumption in Western society is that life gives way to death in a "razor-thin" moment. This image has been reinforced by numerous movie and television scenes in which a sick or injured person suddenly falls silent and lies still, the struggle is then over. These depictions are also consistent with the inclination to see much of reality in dichotomous terms. One either wins or loses; one's conclusions are either right or wrong; a person is either good or bad, a friend or an enemy, and dead or alive. This way of thinking has the advantage of reducing complexity and ambiguity, but the disadvantages of oversimplification and premature judgment. By contrast, Eastern religions and scientific thought are more likely to emphasize process and flow. Buddhists and Hindus, for example, regard perpetual change as a basic feature of the universe. Within this worldview, living and dying can be regarded as a tidal play of forces that occur throughout life.

Death certificates seem to support the assumption that there is a clear and definitive moment of death when time of death is recorded. Often, though, this information is based on estimates rather than direct observation. A resident of a long-term care facility or a hospital patient may have been seen alive at Time A and then discovered dead at Time B. Precisely when the death occurred between A and B is unknown, but a time is recorded to complete the certificate. It is not unusual for the death certificate to be signed by a physician who was not there at the specified time. There can also be a strategic basis for selecting the moment of death. For example, a patient who dies in the operating room may not be pronounced dead until moved to a postsurgery unit.

No reliable information is available on the number of deaths that are actually witnessed, whether at home, in the community, or in medical care settings. Patients enrolled in hospice programs seem to have a better chance for companionship at the time of death, but even then this does not always happen. The collective experience of caregivers and researchers suggests that many people pass from life to death without another person at their side. Nobody knows if they experienced a definitive moment of death.

It can be difficult to identify a moment of death when the person has not been able to respond and communicate effectively for some time. This situation may arise after a stroke, drug reaction, or catastrophic failure of the cardiovascular or some other system. A nurse could detect the cessation of vital functions if the patient is on life support, and this might be considered the moment of death. Not all unresponsive patients are under this kind of intensive observation, however, and nurses may have conflicting duties to perform even when they are trying to monitor vital signs.

The moment of death has become a more problematic concept with the changing definitions of death and the technological advances that can keep basic physiological systems going even if there is no discernible mental functioning. The person may seem to have perished some time ago, and the moment of death may become a matter of professional, family, and legal decision making. Even a slight possibility of recovery, though, can create the lingering question of whether or not the moment of death has actually occurred.

How one decides to define the moment of death also depends on one's willingness to consider rigor mortis and other physiological processes that continue for some time afterward. The person is dead, but organic processes still have their sequences to complete.

The Mystery of the Moment

The moment of death is not as clear and firm a fact as many people have often supposed. It has been defined and assessed in many ways throughout history, and there may be other changes yet to come. For personal, religious, and bureaucratic purposes it is often useful to assume that a specific, identifiable moment separates life from death. Biomedical research and experience offers only mixed support for this belief. The body becomes cooler after death, for example, but people have survived at even lower temperatures. A sudden "flat-line" shift in electrical brain activity is considered evidence for death, yet the readings may be continued for another twenty-four hours just to be sure.

Nevertheless, there have also been many observations to verify an obvious moment of death for some people. Companions have seen a person change in an instant, as though a subtle wave had passed through them (or a subtle something had passed from them). Everything seems to be as it was a moment before—except that a vital quality is missing and a shell of the person left behind. The sense of moment has occasionally been intensified by the feeling that an energy has been shared from the dying person to the companion. Known as the "death flash," this phenomenon has not been successfully studied but has experiential validity for those who feel that they have been part of a mysterious transfer.

The moment of death is unlikely to be the same for the dying person and the other people who may be in attendance. The dying person might have a final experience before the signs become visible to others. Similarly, a person might be considered by others to have passed into death but actually retain some form of mental life, possibly even continuous awareness of the situation. Still again, death might occur so suddenly that the afflicted person has no time to register any experience. Battlefield deaths have provided many examples. Some soldiers killed in the battle of Gettysburg, for example, remained frozen in their active positions, such as scaling a wall. For these victims there may not have been a moment of death, but their last moments remained as though fixed forever in time for those who later entered the killing ground.

Depending on the perspective one takes, then, the moment of death can be seen to be a religious image, a bureaucratic convenience, or a sociomedical complexity.


Read more: http://www.deathreference.com/Me-Nu/Mom ... z0UKm0eIGE
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I welcome our new google overlords

Postby gyre » Mon Oct 19, 2009 5:04 am

Google Wave

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The following information on Google Wave may not be 100% "real" or "accurate," but you'll agree that it makes a lot of sense and that it's probably what Google has planned. I mean, maybe. In any case, it's shocking.

Google Wave is exciting, but it's also very confusing. It's hard to understand how all of its elements work together, especially when you take into account the just-revealed elements we're ready to share with you now. It's pretty complicated, but once you understand its ins and outs, you'll agree that it has the potential to change the way we interact online.

Google Wave is made up of many separate components. Conversations within the program are called Waves. Subthreads of these conversations are called Wavelets. And individual messages are called Blips. These can all be edited and viewed real-time by anyone in your Wave group. Think of it as a living conversation that can be traced from its inception to its final form.

Now, Google has revealed that all of these pieces of user-entered data will be fed into Google's Beachcomber service, which sorts through, tossing organized and compiled data sets over to Blue Whale for analysis.

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Blue Whale is Google's new AI engine, and it'll use Wave data to become autonomous and all-knowing. Blue Whale will eventually lead your discussions by recalling past information used in Wave groups. It will keep you honest by comparing new statements with your past statements. Think of it as an autonomous, administrator-level additional member of any group included in your Waves.

Blue Whale works hand-in-hand with Google's Bottomfeeder targeted advertising bot, which will serve ads based not only on the content of your Waves, Wavelets and Blips, but also the personality scores that Blue Whale automatically compiles. If you're more aggressive with your Wave postings, for example, you may be shown ads for Ultimate Fighting or roller coasters. If you're more apt to demure to authority, you may be shown spots for feminine hygiene products or CuteOverload.com.

Users will of course have the option to turn off Bottomfeeder's ads, but if they want to keep using Google Wave, they'll need to agree to have Stingrays installed in their homes and offices. These are Google's new audio and video surveillance cameras, which are controlled by Blue Whale. They aren't monitored by people, so Google says there are fewer privacy concerns. Stingrays recognize brands and products and how you use them, focusing in on user interaction with everything from electronics to food. This will create excellent market research, which Google will then anonymize and sell to corporations.

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Of course, if ad blockers are used to prevent Bottomfeeder's ads from showing, or Stingrays are blocked or tampered with, Google reserves the right to use Great White to damage your online reputation by pulling private and humiliating information from your Wave history. It'll spread the information to your contacts based on the Swordfish algorithm, which analyzes which people will be the most offended by each particular nugget of data. Great White will continue until the ad blocker is removed and/or Stingrays are returned to proper working order.

Image

If Great White fails, Google will activate its new Mako nanomachines—currently being bundled with the H1N1 flu vaccination. Once Makos are installed in your body, they'll attack the pain receptors in your joints, making movement near impossible. You'll have a hard time focusing, and sleep will be out of the question. Google is promising that Mako will increase targeted ad penetration to the coveted 95th percentile.

As you can see, with Wave, Google is really broadening the scope of what it delivers. The possibilities that it offers are really exciting, and we look forward to starting to use it in our day-to-day lives. So, in conclusion, I made this all up, so please don't sue me. Clam clam seahorse, and the crab boat narwhal.

http://gizmodo.com/5381615/google-wave- ... ian-future
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Postby littleflower » Tue Oct 20, 2009 9:08 am

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Man Pillow

Postby gyre » Sun Oct 25, 2009 1:26 pm

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Postby Ugly Dougly » Mon Oct 26, 2009 10:29 am

That's so sad.

Get yourself a man who doesn't stay out late, and you won't need that pathetic pillow.

Can I get her number?
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Postby gyre » Mon Oct 26, 2009 10:54 am

Junko Suzuki
Call her.

http://www.udemakura.jp/
http://www.udemakura.jp/lineup.html

I understand there is an alarm clock that shakes you awake too.

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http://boyfriendpillow.net/
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Postby theCryptofishist » Fri Oct 30, 2009 6:12 pm

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The Lady with a Lamprey

"The powerful are exploiting people, art and ideas, and this leads to us plebes debating how to best ration ice.
Man, no wonder they always win....." Lonesomebri


Get a Taint, you pathetic cur!
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Postby gyre » Fri Oct 30, 2009 6:29 pm

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Postby theCryptofishist » Fri Oct 30, 2009 6:45 pm

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The Lady with a Lamprey

"The powerful are exploiting people, art and ideas, and this leads to us plebes debating how to best ration ice.
Man, no wonder they always win....." Lonesomebri


Get a Taint, you pathetic cur!
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Postby littleflower » Sat Oct 31, 2009 10:21 pm

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i know, JK posted it last year .... but it's good enough for a repeat ...
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Postby gyre » Sat Oct 31, 2009 10:41 pm

Wonderful map.
And I love those jack'o'lanterns!


I was just wondering if any gay people dress up in straight costume for halloween?
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Postby littleflower » Sat Oct 31, 2009 10:56 pm

i know plenty of gay people who dress like anyone else ......... in fact, i think MOST do ....

but ... i did dress up as a dominatrix style drag queen-ish once, and went out in weho, just to confuse people .... and i did ... ha hah ahahaha! that was fun.

i get discouraged at all the looky-loos out there, though. kids are more fun.....
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Postby Sham » Tue Nov 03, 2009 3:17 am

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Postby gyre » Tue Nov 03, 2009 3:37 am

littleflower wrote:i know plenty of gay people who dress like anyone else ......... in fact, i think MOST do ....
.

You mean, like brown shoes and black pants?
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