Is the Check-List Missing Something??

Questions, answers, tips & tricks for newbies and veterans alike

Is the Check-List Missing Something??

Postby NaughtySnowAngel » Mon Dec 29, 2003 4:28 pm

Okay I have read the checklists on www.burningman.com and all of the posts in this forum, but I want to hear from those who have gone before....

Is there anything missing from the list?

Are there things that you brought the second year that you didn't bring the first?

Are there things to bring that really make it an easier/more enjoyable/etc.?


I am very curious if there is anything I should be keeping an eye out for and anything that might not jump out at me while packing that I shouldn't be without!

Thanks!
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Postby Chai Guy » Mon Dec 29, 2003 5:48 pm

this is the list, my comments are in red

What You Must Bring:
• 1.5 gallons of water per person per day (for drinking, showering, washing, and food preparation.) Keep a bottle of water with you at all times.
I go ahead an bring 2 gallons. I suggest using either 5 gallon plastic jugs and a office style cooler or collapsible water containers that you find in the camping stores. The regular "suitcase" style water containers create a huge trash problem on the way home and they take up a lot of room. The first two options are recyclable and they can be filled up at one of the grocery store water vending machines in Reno, thus saving you weight as well.

• Enough food/beverages for your entire party
Yep, Think food from cultures that live in the desert, things like hummus, pitas and what not. Have lot's of snacks and easy to prepare food, but bring food that is nutritious and that you will enjoy eating. Think about bringing things that you can cook and serve out of one pot to make everything easier. Remember, you probably won't be as hungry as you are at home.

• First aid kit
Always a good idea.

• Warm clothing for evenings—this is a desert at 4000 feet elevation!
This one really get's over looked. The nights can seem exceptionally cold when contrasted with the high day time temps. Bring hats, gloves, long underwear, cold weather sleeping bags (or lot's of blankets).

• Bedding and shelter of some type; the winds can exceed 75 mph, and the mid-day temperature can exceed 100°
There are all kinds of links on shade and this is too big of a subject to get into here. Check out Bob's info here:
http://home.pacbell.net/bullnose/bluetarp.htm
The basics are this, if you have a traditional camping tent you are going to roast in the day time. You need to set up an additional shade structure above the tent, preferably one with a reflective top. The secondary shade structure should also have sides attached to offer more protection from the sun. No matter what you decide to do, it has to be bomb proof to survive the high winds.


• A good camp tent is recommended along with warm sleeping bags. Evening temperatures can be in the 40’s.

• Garbage bags
I recommend setting up 3 different trash containers, one for burnable trash which you will burn at one of the designated sites at the event. Another for aluminum, which you can donate to recycle camp or take home with you and recycle it there and the third for all other trash. This technique has greatly reduced the amount of trash I've had to take home in past years. Of course the easiest way to avoid a problem with trash is to bring as little packaging and other refuse material as possible, go throw that stuff away before you pack.
• Any required prescriptions, contact lens supplies (disposables work great), or whatever else you need to maintain your health and comfort in a remote area with no services
Goggles really help in dust storms (especially with my contacts). Some people are too sensitive to even wear contacts in this environment, so if you are a contact lense wearer, bring glasses too, just in case.
• Flashlights and spare batteries (headlamps are useful)—to be sure you can see and be seen at night.
Headlamps are great, especially in the porta-potty! Get the LED kind, I haven't replaced the AAA batteries in mine for years. I don't recommend glow sticks as they create trash, instead get some blinkies or other battery operated lights, they are less expensive than glow sticks in the long run too.
• Sunscreen/sunblock lotion and sunglasses
Don't forget lip protection with an SPF rating too.
• Fire extinguishers, if you plan to burn your art
• Common sense, an open mind, and a positive attitude
We Strongly Suggest You Bring:
• Shade structures, umbrellas, parasols, sheets; something to break the cruel mid-day sun
• A wide brim hat
Make sure your hat has a chin strap so that it does not blow off in the wind.
• A cooking stove if you expect to heat food or liquid
• A bicycle (mountain bikes or “cruisers” with balloon tires are best) which must be equipped with a light (for safe nighttime travel). A lock is helpful.
Really all you need is a beach cruiser, bikes tend to get pretty thrashed and I recommend you pick one up at a garage sale vs. using your daily commuter.
• Portable shower
See the Shower thread on this BB
• Earplugs! (Not everyone is going to want to sleep when you do.)
• Watertight protective bags (e.g. heavy zip-type) for cameras or electronic gear
• Lotion/lip balm to treat cracked skin
• Smokers: portable ashtrays (e.g. an empty candy tin, or film canister)
• Costumes, musical instruments, props, banners, signs, and anything else you can think of that might make the experience more fun for you and your playa neighbors
• Fire extinguisher
• A radio
• Camp marker (flag, flasher, distinctive marking)
• Particle/dust mask (Dust storms are not uncommon.)
Those small paper masks are about useless, get a respirator type mask or better yet a rafiki or scarf/bandana work fairly well.
• 12" tent stakes (High winds are likely.)
I suggest rebar, 2 -3 foot length
• Plastic bottles or tennis balls to top and protect dangerous rebar stakes
You will also want to bring something to mark your guy lines with, so people don't run into them at night.
• Goggles to protect eyes in case of dust storms
• Extra set of car keys
Helpful Things to Bring:
• Tire repair kit and extra tubes for bikes
• Sewing kit
• Rope and/or string
• Ribbons, Mylar, etc., to flag tent ropes/guy lines
• Handy wipes
• Duct tape
• Spray bottle (for misting)
• Rugs to keep dust down in your camp
• Gifts to give to new friends
• Calling card just in case you have to make a personal call from Gerlach
Things NOT to Bring:
• Feathers of any kind e.g., boas (they shed, no matter what you do—try marabou instead)
• Glass containers of any kind
• Excess packaging from foods (For example, remove outer box from cereals and just bring the inner bag.)
• Loose glitter
• Nuts in their shells
• Too much fresh produce. Many melons are thrown out at the end of the week.
• Anything that will break up and/or blow away in the wind (trees, twigs, loose paper, etc)
[quote]
Also buy the "good" Coleman or other style cooler, well worth the investment.

A mat or carpeting in your shade structure is nice, it keeps the dust down.

Chairs to sit in, especially the new "recliner" model camp chairs are great.

A personal mister is a god send (especially with a drop of essential oil, like lavender, put into the water)

A basket for your bike makes carrying extra water/supplies/ice so much easier

A camel back type water container or one of those mesh style straps to hold your water bottle means that you can carry your water with you at all times without having to remember to "hold" onto it.

A small back pack or bike messenger type bag is great for putting things like your lipbalm, sunscreen, camera, gifts, etc. when you cruise around the playa. Remember to bring your sunglasses/sunscreen with you at night just in case you have to make the "Walk of Shame" the next morning.

Think about how you are going to light your camp at night. Nothing is more frustrating than fumbling around in the dark trying to locate that perfect accessory to your costume, when you KNOW you packed it, and then finding it the next morning in the light of day. The battery operated lights tend to die quickly and eat through batteries, the propane lanterns burn hot and make that horrible hissing sound. I'm still experimenting with this one, and will probably go with a solar panel and some LEDs next year.

FOOT CARE- Very important! I bring a container to soak my feet in, fill it up with water and add some lemon juice. I soak my feet every night before I go to bed and then apply lotion and put on clean cotton socks. This helps prevent playa foot, something you don't want to get.

Hope this helps- Chai : )
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Postby NaughtySnowAngel » Mon Dec 29, 2003 6:21 pm

Chai-

THANK YOU for all your most helpful comments! This will be my first burning man and I am a bit nervous, due mostly to my neurotic tendencies, plus given the fact that my husband may have to miss the trip since his semester begins mid August.....but I am going to camp with Burning Man Vets....they have welcomed us into their happy little family, but I feel as if sometimes I drive them all a bit batty with all my questions!

As far as a tent or shade structure...what do you use/recommend?

And as far as trash goes...thanks for the tip on 3 seperate ones....but where and in what do you keep the trash bags? Obviously in 75mph winds cans would be gone with the wind.
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Postby Badger » Mon Dec 29, 2003 10:12 pm

OK, I've scattered this like buckshot all over the board but...

send me e-mail and I'll send you a copy of my list. Not the most comprehensive but darn close to including most of what you'll need for a decent stay.
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Postby Chai Guy » Tue Dec 30, 2003 10:23 am

As far as a tent or shade structure...what do you use/recommend?


I suggest trying to use your vehicle (hopefully a van or a truck) as part of your shade structure. Your vehicle will provide an excellent wind break, as well as an anchor for your shade structure, plus you can also use it to store your gear and maybe even sleep in in it. (some people will say that vehicles get too hot to sleep in and that you are better off sleeping in a tent. I think that by creating a shade structure on the east side of the vehicle to block the early morning sun, and blocking off the windows with mylar or a space blanket you can keep your vehicle cool enough to withstand the heat.) So I use my van as an anchor point and create an awning using metal conduit and special joints (the kind they use at your local swap meet for vending booths (not the cheapo awnings they sell at Wal mart). Then I anchor the thing down by driving in a rebar stake at each base pole and duct taping the pole to the rebar and I anchor it again at each corner using rope and rebar. A little duct-tape at the joints along with the wing nuts keeps everything together, be careful with duct tape though, because it melts and becomes like glue. I get a a good tarp with built in grommets and use the ball style bungee cords to strap down the tarp along with zip ties for added strength. Learn more about it here:
http://www.chefjuke.com/burnman/awning.html

And as far as trash goes...thanks for the tip on 3 seperate ones....but where and in what do you keep the trash bags? Obviously in 75mph winds cans would be gone with the wind.


I use 5 gallon buckets with lids (they stack well), then I use trash compactor bags, they are smaller and easier to transport home because you don't have to find room for a huge trash bag, just a few smaller ones. They are also incredibly strong and really hold the foul odors in when you are travelling with your "new plastic friend". I place them near one of the metal conduit poles and run a rope through their handles to keep them from blowing away in the event of a really big storm (probably overkill). I also clearly label them so people know which trash goes where. (I still had a campmate last year that just couldn't grasp the concept of paper, aluminum and "other"- he won't be camping with us next year).

Feel free to PM me with questions anytime. Hope this helps.
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You down with OPP?

Postby Chai Guy » Tue Dec 30, 2003 3:35 pm

OPP (other people's packinglists)

The Civilized Explorer
http://www.cieux.com/bm/things.html

Neil's Notes:
http://burningcam.com/travel-notes/#bring

Matt's Extra items:
http://www.magicink.com/burningman/98/equipment.txt

Disturbia's list
http://www.disturbia.com/pack.htm

Ranger Dogboy's list
http://www.softcom.net/users/rocksci/bman/

Blinky Red Things List:
http://www.blinkyredthings.org/help/supplies.html

Jim's Packing list:
http://members.cox.net/tribe/jimslist.html

??? Packing list:
http://www.gumption.org/2000/blue/things.htm

Carla King's list (me likes, me likes!)
http://www.wildwritingwomen.com/zine/co ... _1203.html

Vaults of Erowid packing list and FAQ
http://www.erowid.org/culture/burningman/burnfaq.shtml

Suzanne Henderson's list (No way I could have survived with so little!)
http://www.xixstar.com/fishy/1267.html

Greg's packing list:
http://www.zer0.org/bman/packing-list

A packing list in easy to use Excel spreadsheet format:
http://www.hidale.com/burningman/bm_supplies_2002.xls

An annotated list:
http://home.comcast.net/~pgutoski/survi ... glong.html

Alternative Energy Zone's List
http://www.ae-zone.org/Tips/bmcamplist.htm

Emily Sparkle and Bucky's list:
http://users.rcn.com/fontaholic/burn/list.shtml

Karmic savings tips and lists:
http://www.karmicsavingsandom.com/BM_Planning_faq.htm

Mashscara's tips and lists:
http://www.ggreg.com/bm/supplies.htm

a down and dirty list:
http://www.flash.net/~jtimko/bm98/burningmanlist.htm

Lists of Packing lists, including Badgers:
http://www.burningbeach.com/packng/

Anal Retantive's List:
http://www.flutterby.com/places/burningman/

Not so much a list, but a great guide to Leave No Trace and camp clean up from the Church of MEZ:
http://www.mezziah.org/burningman/Cleanup/

Chef Juke's Hints on Food Storage:
http://www.cieux.com/bm/foodPlaya.html
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Postby NaughtySnowAngel » Tue Dec 30, 2003 3:45 pm

WoW!!!!! Thank you Chai Guy!!! You have gone above and beyond! I now have some good reading material for my evening of flu killing!

I am intrigued about the information you posted about your shade structure.....I have a suv type car/truck whatever you want to call it......so I could attach something on it/around it from the roof rack....when we have gone camping my car has been the "home base" storing the bikes, food, supplies, etc. I could easily sleep in my car (it was actually designed for it) and I do have a air mattress that fits in the back.....but I don;t know if I want to sleep in it or use a tent.....not sure yet.

Do you have any pictures of your set-up from last year that you could share?

You will grow to hate the neurotic individual that I am.....did I mention that I am obsessive complusive? Thank god I have less than 250 days to obsess about this! (just kidding....kinda)

*smochies*
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Postby unjonharley » Tue Dec 30, 2003 4:20 pm

If you go for the tent. Make sure it is large enough to stand up in. Otherwise you wll learn to hate tents.It's no fun craweling around for a week.
/Running to catch the last basket of the day
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Postby ragnar1963 » Tue Dec 30, 2003 6:13 pm

The website checklist doesn't mention these, but some personal checklists do, and I advocate them to whomever I can: baby wipes. Bring a lot. Just a quick bodily wipe-down--after a walk, first thing in the morning, before bed-- is SO refreshing. (Freeze them ahead of time and keep them in the cooler for a truly orgasmic experience.) Also, they're handy in the kitchen--handier than wetting a sponge or paper towel eveytime you want to clean something. Keep 'em out of the porta-potties, though.
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Postby Badger » Tue Dec 30, 2003 7:11 pm

baby wipes. Bring a lot.


I'll be gifting diesel wipes in 2004.

Don't ask. Just use your imagination.
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Postby unjonharley » Tue Dec 30, 2003 7:24 pm

Badger wrote:

I'll be gifting diesel wipes in 2004.

Don't ask. Just use your imagination.


/
Don't buy those damn things that come in a round tube. Scented baby wipes smell worse than shit. Be careful to buy unscented in a box type despenser. Carry a moop bag with you.
/Running to catch the last basket of the day
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