yurt?

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yurt?

Postby antron » Tue Dec 02, 2003 6:45 pm

i'm thinking about building a yurt for next year. i'd like to be able to walk upright in my tent. not sure how large to go, not sure if they get too hot. have any of you built / used one?
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Postby unjonharley » Tue Dec 02, 2003 7:17 pm

Think about sewing mylar to lite sail cloth. Then add a "passive soler" exhaust. or two
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yurt

Postby yupimthenewguy » Thu Dec 04, 2003 5:42 pm

i have seen one in use, the wall was put together on site, the wheel on top is the tricky part, especially lining up the roof supports with the wheel.
ooh.. cold like metal :_)
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yurt?

Postby burnerboy33 » Mon Dec 29, 2003 11:06 pm

OK, Im stupid. What is a yert?
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Postby Badger » Mon Dec 29, 2003 11:44 pm

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Desert dogs drink deep.

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Postby Bob » Tue Dec 30, 2003 4:39 am

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Too many battens
& too few Tibetans.
Amazing desert structures & stuff: http://sites.google.com/site/potatotrap/

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Postby Badger » Tue Dec 30, 2003 3:01 pm

I have a friend down in Santa Cruz that has a main sail from one of the older America's Cup contenders. It was never used due to some imperfections in the manufacturing process (seams or some such thing).

This thing is HUGE. It's made of Kevlar and is an opaque gold/brown color. There's probably 75 square meters of the stuff.

We've been staring at this thing for a few years now trying to figure out what to do with this thing but find ourselves challenged. Our biggest fear being that if we used the sail as a single surface to come up wih some sort of structure that the wind would do to it exactly what sails are meant to do. Namely, catch the wind and go flying down the playa after pulling itself free from whatever we used to anchor it.

Any ideas or suggestions?
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Postby Chai Guy » Tue Dec 30, 2003 3:55 pm

Hey Badger,

I'm currently working on a design that involves a single pole approximately 20-30 ft. tall. I plan on attaching small triangular pieces of fabric using aircraft wire as guy lines from the top of the pole and then anchoring them at the base. So basically you would have this large pole with 4 triangular pieces of fabric securely fastened to the pole and guy wires. I also plan on cutting chevrons in the fabric for extra cross ventilation and to reduce the "sail" effect. Would something like this work for you?
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Postby Bob » Wed Dec 31, 2003 4:39 am

re: sails

Keep in mind the "king" posts in the Cafe ya'll hate to love stick up about 20 ft and are buried 3 ft. The long wire rope guy lines are secured with 4" dia screw anchors embedded less than 3 ft. It won't blow away, but it only stays upright because of the network of crossing cables.

It's covered in shade mesh, but I don't doubt that the Cafe would hold up with solid fabric -- if it could be pulled taut and otherwise prevented from dishing inward.

Sails are highly convexing. A row of stiff/braced arches, as with a quonset hut or the Ammonite, should be suitable, if proportioned to support the curvature of the sail. Charlie Gadekan uses cable, A-frames, and screw anchors for his >300 ft canvases.

http://images.burningman.com/index.cgi?q_keyword=Ammonite
http://images.burningman.com/index.cgi?q_keyword=Illumination

Work with a scaled-down old-bedsheet model and use wire stuck in the ground to model the arches, maybe. Best to stay as low as possible, like a bedouin tent. Figure rope and cable in the many hundreds of feet.
Amazing desert structures & stuff: http://sites.google.com/site/potatotrap/

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Postby diane o'thirst » Mon Apr 05, 2004 11:08 pm

I took one of Pacific Yurts' offerings to the '98 Burn for my shelter. '99 the damn thing attacked me and smashed up my eye (remember that, III?), so it sat in storage for that year and the next because I was seriously intimidated. In 2001 I'd mostly gotten over that experience and we set it up in Opera Diaspora. It served as a small ritual/chill zone (about 12-15 body capacity), and has become a semi-permanent part of Opera Camp every year since.

I can't say enough about yurts. Simply put, they're wonderful and right up there with pyramids for Playa structures. You can light them up with 2-3 strings of faerie lights and they glow like Chinese lanterns when illuminated like this at night. The '98 setup weathered the storm that postponed Temple of Rudra with scarcely a batted eyelash, and as a one-person shelter setup it was positively decadent. Full bed, bike, papasan chair and shower setup all fit in it (16' diameter). You can transport it in a 4x8' trailer with space left over. The only downside is they take several hours to put up and it can't be done solo. You'll need to shanghai at least 2-3 people when you're raising the rafters.

Just be sure to wear a crash helmet and impact-resistent goggles when you do... :x
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Postby antron » Sun Apr 11, 2004 10:26 pm

i'm still undecided on the yurt, but leaning toward it. i'll probably make it a summer project.

badger, i'd be careful with the ac sail as shelter. it would probably make great shelter *parts*. depending on the era of the sail, they may have been made from many triangular panels (kevlar hasn't been used for ac mains in for the past three cups or so... the latest ones are made on curved molds, with threads glued individually (they'd be worse for shelter re-use because of the built-in curve). kevlar sails are pretty strong. still, the sail parts would probably work best pulled taught. kevlar sails make a lot of noise if they can flap.
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Postby BAS » Sat May 01, 2004 4:39 pm

Hey, I have been thinking about using Burning Man as an excuse to build a yurt (or is that the other way around?). I downloaded the link from AE's website, but I still have some questions:

1) how does one go about putting a floor in one of these things? The SCA structure doesn't seem to have a floor, but, since I have read that the playa is very alkaline and dusty, I think I would like to have one.

2) are the yurts actually anchored? I didn't see anything about this in the set up instructions, but I would think that 70+ miles per hour winds might make even a round, wide based structure go airborn!


Thanks,


Brian (who will now have to find a woodshop to borrow)
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Securing

Postby diane o'thirst » Sat May 01, 2004 4:52 pm

Pacific Yurts publishes a deck plan. Basically, it's an 8 pie-slice deck with an 18" hole in the centre, resting on edge-on 2x4 triangle frame. The decking is 3/4" plywood or OSB.

We haven't built a deck for the yurt I've loaned my camp yet, mainly because I don't have the facilities to build or transport something that big to the Playa from Lane County, OR. We haven't seemed to notice anything wrong with that except that it gets dusty in there (we have a 15' braided oval rug that we lay down inside).

Definitely secure it down, especially if you leave the dome open. It's pretty easy: I just use five rebar kandykanes snaked through the lattice at the bottom: two on either side of the door, one opposite the door and the other two at the midpoints of the triangle created. It dun' move.

Make sure to position the dome to open at the same angle as the door and position both to the lee of the wind.
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Postby BAS » Sat May 01, 2004 8:27 pm

I have some of the same problems with building and transporting a deck. I was thinking more of some sort of ground cloth attached to the walls or some such.

The anchoring information definitely helps!


Thanks!


Brian
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Do things that have never been done."
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Postby diane o'thirst » Sat May 01, 2004 9:59 pm

Ground tarp, that'll work.

Consider: the Mongols don't build decks for their girs (yurts) and they live in a worse desert than we do :)
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Postby BAS » Sun May 02, 2004 4:53 pm

Consider: the Mongols don't build decks for their girs (yurts) and they live in a worse desert than we do


Good point. Ya know, if I still had my job at the hospital, I might ask some of them about yurts/girs...! :)
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