SuperFabrics with Built-in Sunscreen and AC!

What to wear? What not to wear? Where to find and how to make anything from goggles to fantastic pieces of playawear.

SuperFabrics with Built-in Sunscreen and AC!

Postby Jordancc » Fri Jun 01, 2012 10:34 am

I'm all inspired to sew up some stuff . . and avoid getting swarmed by freckles like I was last year. I'm so Irish I can't tan at gunpoint. Anyway I found they make fabrics now with built-in SPF (for fabric it's called UPF), so I thought I'd pass it along. If you're sewing, why not use fabric that is good for you? Some of the fabrics also have wicking technology that keeps you cool. Modernity is just too nifty. I haven't found any in stores but if you Google UPF fabric and Under Armour HeatGear you'll get some hits.
Happy Sewing
Pomegranates are the most perfect food.
Jordancc
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 6:22 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: SuperFabrics with Built-in Sunscreen and AC!

Postby Dewi » Fri Jun 01, 2012 8:00 pm

Thanks for the tip Jordan. I will definitely have to consider using this on my next sewing project! :)
User avatar
Dewi
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 10:32 am
Location: Dallas, TX
Burning Since: 2012
Camp Name: Club Neu

Re: SuperFabrics with Built-in Sunscreen and AC!

Postby Bob » Fri Jun 01, 2012 8:05 pm

Well fuck me, I love freckles.
Amazing desert structures & stuff: http://sites.google.com/site/potatotrap/

"Let us say I suggest you may be human." -- Reverend Mother Gaius Helen Mohiam
User avatar
Bob
 
Posts: 6762
Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2003 10:00 am
Location: San Francisco
Burning Since: 1986
Camp Name: Royaneh

Re: SuperFabrics with Built-in Sunscreen and AC!

Postby theCryptofishist » Fri Jun 01, 2012 9:50 pm

I miss my freckles. It's been decades...
Simon's real sig line?

Embrace the Sock

Winners never quilt, quilters never win...
User avatar
theCryptofishist
 
Posts: 37413
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2004 10:28 am
Location: In Exile
Burning Since: 2017

Re: SuperFabrics with Built-in Sunscreen and AC!

Postby FeetOfClay » Thu Jun 07, 2012 6:19 am

don't have any experience with sunscreen fabric, but I *can* give my 2cents about moisture wicking fabric (last year I walked a 1/2 marathon, and wore moisture wicking tech-gear fabric items for most of my training, and during the event).

Moisture Wicking Fabric:

Pros: very comfortable and lightweight (can be layered in cooler temps), less chafing and fewer blisters (this fabric glides on itself smoothly), looks great on (no wrinkles; makes u look sporty), lots of colors, cheap to get (look for fitness wear in discount stores), dries quickly from sweat/rain/washing/etc

Cons: REALLY exacerbates B.O. Seriously, you can shower, use deodorant, put on one of these tech shirts, and your pits will stink in 20 minutes. and the fabric holds odors. search any running site, and you will see lots of comments about the smellifying factor of these tech fabrics.

verdict:
tech/wicking farbric gear will be great if: you plan to wear each tech item only once or twice (NOT all week thru the event); you have access to a daily camp shower and lots of deodorant; you tend not to be a BO-ish person EVER; you create tech garments that still leave your pits exposed (tank tops better than long sleeves, etc)

oh, and, the stink factor goes double for tech gear PANTS. i will say no more :)
What is this quintessence of dust?
User avatar
FeetOfClay
 
Posts: 274
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2012 5:46 pm
Location: NY
Burning Since: 2012
Camp Name: Anonymous Village

Re: SuperFabrics with Built-in Sunscreen and AC!

Postby catinthefunnyhat » Thu Jun 07, 2012 7:04 am

FoC: Have you tried washing with baking soda?
I use tech fabrics for my workouts/running. I definitely notice the stink factor. (I find most synthetics are the same way, technical or not). But I find that washing with baking soda (always in cold water, never hot, and always hanging to dry) restores them to freshness.
But, yes, on the playa -- where laundering ain't gonna be an option, and showering is barely one -- this will be a major strike against wearing tech fabrics.
If you want drama to stop following you everywhere, try letting go of the leash.
User avatar
catinthefunnyhat
 
Posts: 2182
Joined: Sat Mar 10, 2012 4:24 pm
Location: Toronto, Canada

Re: SuperFabrics with Built-in Sunscreen and AC!

Postby FeetOfClay » Thu Jun 07, 2012 7:17 am

never thought of that--thanks!!!

baking soda is definitely a cure-all for lots of stinks, messes, and stuff :)

CatInTheFunnyHat: you rock and i love your posts!!! what camp are u with? gonna give u a big hug on the playa :) (no just b/c of the baking soda, but b/c you're cool)
What is this quintessence of dust?
User avatar
FeetOfClay
 
Posts: 274
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2012 5:46 pm
Location: NY
Burning Since: 2012
Camp Name: Anonymous Village

Re: SuperFabrics with Built-in Sunscreen and AC!

Postby catinthefunnyhat » Thu Jun 07, 2012 7:29 am

FoC: Aw, thanks! :oops: You're sweet (I mean generally, not just when you're flattering me), and I'm looking forward to meeting you, too! Hugs will ensue! :mrgreen:

I am with a small group of friends, and we're still finalizing our choice of camp. Different needs/desires, and all that... But I'll see you at the meet 'n' greet, for sure. (Hmm... that reminds me; I still haven't figured out what I'm bringing/doing for that.. :shock: )
If you want drama to stop following you everywhere, try letting go of the leash.
User avatar
catinthefunnyhat
 
Posts: 2182
Joined: Sat Mar 10, 2012 4:24 pm
Location: Toronto, Canada

Re: SuperFabrics with Built-in Sunscreen and AC!

Postby theCryptofishist » Thu Jun 07, 2012 9:43 am

Hm. With shirts there is the possibility of ripping out the underarm seams and hemming them so that there's airation there...
Simon's real sig line?

Embrace the Sock

Winners never quilt, quilters never win...
User avatar
theCryptofishist
 
Posts: 37413
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2004 10:28 am
Location: In Exile
Burning Since: 2017

Re: SuperFabrics with Built-in Sunscreen and AC!

Postby FeetOfClay » Thu Jun 07, 2012 11:27 am

I still haven't figured out what I'm bringing/doing for that..


Is it customary to bring gifts/drinks/foodstuffs to the Meet & Greet. I don't drink...so maybe i could bring some chilled coconut waters for people? :)

What does one usually bring to this meetup?
What is this quintessence of dust?
User avatar
FeetOfClay
 
Posts: 274
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2012 5:46 pm
Location: NY
Burning Since: 2012
Camp Name: Anonymous Village

Re: SuperFabrics with Built-in Sunscreen and AC!

Postby theCryptofishist » Thu Jun 07, 2012 11:29 am

Simon's real sig line?

Embrace the Sock

Winners never quilt, quilters never win...
User avatar
theCryptofishist
 
Posts: 37413
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2004 10:28 am
Location: In Exile
Burning Since: 2017

Re: SuperFabrics with Built-in Sunscreen and AC!

Postby wh..sh » Thu Jun 07, 2012 11:56 am

catinthefunnyhat wrote:FoC: Have you tried washing with baking soda?
I use tech fabrics for my workouts/running. I definitely notice the stink factor. (I find most synthetics are the same way, technical or not). But I find that washing with baking soda (always in cold water, never hot, and always hanging to dry) restores them to freshness.
But, yes, on the playa -- where laundering ain't gonna be an option, and showering is barely one -- this will be a major strike against wearing tech fabrics.

My husband uses assos washing liquid cleanser on his bike clothes. It works great.
In my world there's only legible and more legible.

-Bob
User avatar
wh..sh
 
Posts: 2191
Joined: Wed Sep 07, 2011 4:16 pm

Re: SuperFabrics with Built-in Sunscreen and AC!

Postby stinkyfoot » Thu Jun 07, 2012 1:36 pm

Technical fabrics, so excellent, but hard to source in regular fabric stores. But there are a few suppliers that fulfill online orders, based in the Pacific NW (where sports gear is born).

I've ordered from Seattle Fabrics before, but they don't always ship on time and they're not good about making sure to describe all product specs on their online catalog. Rockywoods seems to have a good selection for UPF fabrics. I'd start looking there.

Here's a few things that I've learned working with technical fabrics in school (I'm a designer):

Moisture Wicking: These fabrics are soft and stretchy and made of nylon, or other synthetic fibers. They allow moisture from sweat to pass through their knit, keeping the skin dry. Leotard fabric. Good option for skintight daytime playa wear. Get freezing immediately if worn without outer insulation.

There are lots of nylon/polyester blends to be had in regular fabric stores, also, that work basically the same way but the technical versions will be more durable, come with antimicrobial, anti-odor or UV resistant coatings, and generally be manufactured to a higher standard. It might be worth using a technical wicking fabric if you need some kind of base layer for a suit made entirely of plastic or some other non-breathable substance (like the black body stockings that come with storm trooper outfits), or if you want a skintight outfit that can be worn more than once even after hours of sweaty use. Natural equivalent: Knit cotton or other plant fibers, jersey, light knit wool or animal fibers.

DWR: Stands for durable, water resistant. Usually some kind of woven synthetic/blend with a hydrophobic chemical treatment applied to it, kind of like a precisely applied Scotch Guard. Used in tents, outerwear and in home and marine applications. These fabrics come in many weights and weaves for different uses. Some of the most complicated DWR fabrics are used in performance snow gear.

DWR fabrics might not be worth the money spent on playa clothes, but you'll probably encounter this acronym if you're looking for materials to make tents or shade structures. DWR fabrics are desirable for people coverings because they are more breathable than their other water repellant cousin ripstop. Natural equivalents: Silk, wool weave, cotton (heavy-light weave).

Ripstop: Is it a plastic or is it a fabric? These are woven fabrics made of nylon that might also be coated with silicone for the ultimate water and elemental repellant. Most sporty backpacks and messenger bags are made of various types of nylon ripstop as well as the all weather type tents. If you want not dust at all to get on something use a silicone impregnated ripstop cover. For the most secure containment, sew with a fine point needle and fine thread, and seal the seams up with tape or sealer, which can be purchased specially for the purpose.

Ballistic Nylon: Pretty much implies what you think it does. Heavy woven nylon. Probably comes in camo color. Also used often in bags and other gear with the ripstop. Similar to heavy canvas/burlap in use.

Webbing: Either nylon, polyester or natural fibers, is a type of durable strapping often used in bags and backpacks.

UV Resistance: Not to be confused with UPF, (the OP's SPF protective fabric) UV resistance means that the fabric will not discolor in the sunlight.

Technical Fleece: Lots of options here, some keep you warmer than others. Similar heat retaining qualities to knit sweaters. Works best in layers with other types of fabrics.

An outfit consisting of a wicking bodysuit as your first layer, an insulating jumpsuit made of performance fleece for your middle layer, and some kind of DWR outerwear fabric, ballistic nylon/ripstop (I don't know you might use this) or simple denim, canvas or other woven fabric that blocks wind will be very very warm.

You can totally use this theory of layering with natural fibers as well.

Other things:

How warm is my technical fleece? All of these fabrics usually come with some kind of MSDS and specifications of what temperatures and conditions they're best withstand. If you're not sure just ask. Don't freeze out on the playa at midnight because you were lazy about your technical specifications.

Why use technical fabrics when there are natural fibers that work just as well? It's totally your preference. Usually technical fabrics perform better for less bulk, have more stretch and range of motion, and they come in lots of crazy unnatural colors, which might be a plus for some.

Brands: The most important thing to know is that people often confuse brand names with the type of fabric they are most known for producing. Supplex, Gortex, Lycra, and Cordura are some big brands that might sound familiar to you.

Fire safety. All of these performance fabrics are pretty gross when you burn them because of the heavy use of polymers which means they're melt and/or smoke when exposed to flame, so keep this in mind if you tend to get up close and personal with the burns. Many performance fabrics come with fire retardant coatings, but also keep in mind that fire retardant doesn't mean non-combustible. If you expect to get a little singed every once in awhile, sticking with whatever is usually recommended for fire safety would be best.
stinkyfoot
 
Posts: 133
Joined: Sun Jul 31, 2011 11:48 pm


Return to Clothing & Playawear

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests