HexaYurts

Ideas, advice, tips, and tricks regarding shelter, shade, tents, and camping. Yes, this includes RV's too.

Postby asterflower » Tue Feb 17, 2009 2:18 pm

reading through all the posts on here ive decided to make a hexayurt this year. and it being my first year going and me going by myself, how difficult would it be to set up all by my lonesome? or would there be pelnty of people ready and willing to help me setup?

also i think it would be an awesome idea to have a yurt camp :)
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Postby jkisha » Tue Feb 17, 2009 2:59 pm

I think there is a yurt camp. It was somewhere around 6:00 behind center camp--we never were able to find it though.

You need three people minimum, preferably 4 or 6. You should go to a park with 3 people and practice a time or two so that you know what you are doing. There will be plenty of people willing to help on the playa, but you will need to know what you are doing to direct them.

Also pre-assemble your pieces so that you have 3 wall sections (each two pieces that can fold like a book) and your roof sections into 6 folding sections)

Once you do your practice runs you'll understand the above.

JK
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Postby underscore » Tue Feb 17, 2009 3:24 pm

This is going to be my first time out there too and this is the route I'm going, I'll be offering eggs and bacon to anyone who wants to help me get the yurt up out on the playa Monday @ daybreak. Once I get the supplies and test runs going in the next couple months I'll post pictures (even though there are a TON already around the interwebs).
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Postby jkisha » Tue Feb 17, 2009 3:28 pm

Only thing you have to keep in mind is that you can't assemble it if there is a strong or even moderate breeze--not without at least 6 people or more to hold the pieces in place until it is taped and the roof is taped on. Strong breeze or dust storm, forget it! The pieces take off like an airplane wing.

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Postby underscore » Wed Feb 18, 2009 6:59 am

asterflower wrote:reading through all the posts on here ive decided to make a hexayurt this year. and it being my first year going and me going by myself, how difficult would it be to set up all by my lonesome? or would there be pelnty of people ready and willing to help me setup?

also i think it would be an awesome idea to have a yurt camp :)


I'm not sure about the actual yurt camp or anything like that, but I would def. be down for helping you get any yurt setup - as I'm going to be out there trying to do the same thing. Granted it's still early, but never too early to plan.

Also - I'm going to be building some of the furniture from that playatech website. That should make the inside of the yurt a pretty sweet chill/sleep/fun space.
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Postby StarShineScars » Wed Feb 18, 2009 8:20 am

jkisha wrote:I think there is a yurt camp. It was somewhere around 6:00 behind center camp--we never were able to find it though.

You need three people minimum, preferably 4 or 6. You should go to a park with 3 people and practice a time or two so that you know what you are doing. There will be plenty of people willing to help on the playa, but you will need to know what you are doing to direct them.

Also pre-assemble your pieces so that you have 3 wall sections (each two pieces that can fold like a book) and your roof sections into 6 folding sections)

Once you do your practice runs you'll understand the above.

JK


This year we're going up there with a completely folding hexayurt. The roof and bottoms are all taped together. All you need to do is unfold it when you get there. I've seen Vinay Gupta do it on his own but it looks hard, a lot of practice (like said above). Or two people should be able to do it just fine. The main thing to consider is how big do you need it to be. if it's just you in there then a smaller one will be fine and will be a lot easier to put up with just two people, perhaps even one if you practice in the backyard enough. As you'll see the last link has 3 people putting up an 8' one. They're having a bit of trouble but I think a smaller one would be no sweat for two.

Here are some links:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMHACXotJAk
http://hexayurt.com/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnNrDhKySoI
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Postby jkisha » Wed Feb 18, 2009 9:33 am

That's a new video; but it looks like that method would work well (the 8' one), and not be too difficult.

I still don't like the little pop-up one. I think you need to bevel the edges on the small pop-up, no? Plus it's too small. (IMO)

JK

StarShineScars wrote:
jkisha wrote:I think there is a yurt camp. It was somewhere around 6:00 behind center camp--we never were able to find it though.

You need three people minimum, preferably 4 or 6. You should go to a park with 3 people and practice a time or two so that you know what you are doing. There will be plenty of people willing to help on the playa, but you will need to know what you are doing to direct them.

Also pre-assemble your pieces so that you have 3 wall sections (each two pieces that can fold like a book) and your roof sections into 6 folding sections)

Once you do your practice runs you'll understand the above.

JK


This year we're going up there with a completely folding hexayurt. The roof and bottoms are all taped together. All you need to do is unfold it when you get there. I've seen Vinay Gupta do it on his own but it looks hard, a lot of practice (like said above). Or two people should be able to do it just fine. The main thing to consider is how big do you need it to be. if it's just you in there then a smaller one will be fine and will be a lot easier to put up with just two people, perhaps even one if you practice in the backyard enough. As you'll see the last link has 3 people putting up an 8' one. They're having a bit of trouble but I think a smaller one would be no sweat for two.

Here are some links:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMHACXotJAk
http://hexayurt.com/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnNrDhKySoI
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Postby StarShineScars » Wed Feb 18, 2009 9:42 am

You know I'm not really sure. I know that doing the folding one takes a bit more work and that the cuts have to be at specific angles. But personally a little more work at home for things to be easier on the playa is worth it.

jkisha wrote:That's a new video; but it looks like that method would work well (the 8' one), and not be too difficult.

I still don't like the little pop-up one. I think you need to bevel the edges on the small pop-up, no? Plus it's too small. (IMO)

JK

StarShineScars wrote:
jkisha wrote:I think there is a yurt camp. It was somewhere around 6:00 behind center camp--we never were able to find it though.

You need three people minimum, preferably 4 or 6. You should go to a park with 3 people and practice a time or two so that you know what you are doing. There will be plenty of people willing to help on the playa, but you will need to know what you are doing to direct them.

Also pre-assemble your pieces so that you have 3 wall sections (each two pieces that can fold like a book) and your roof sections into 6 folding sections)

Once you do your practice runs you'll understand the above.

JK


This year we're going up there with a completely folding hexayurt. The roof and bottoms are all taped together. All you need to do is unfold it when you get there. I've seen Vinay Gupta do it on his own but it looks hard, a lot of practice (like said above). Or two people should be able to do it just fine. The main thing to consider is how big do you need it to be. if it's just you in there then a smaller one will be fine and will be a lot easier to put up with just two people, perhaps even one if you practice in the backyard enough. As you'll see the last link has 3 people putting up an 8' one. They're having a bit of trouble but I think a smaller one would be no sweat for two.

Here are some links:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMHACXotJAk
http://hexayurt.com/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnNrDhKySoI
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Postby underscore » Wed Feb 18, 2009 11:15 am

The folding yurt is a great idea, too bad it won't fit on the roof rack for me. I am going to try and pre-assemble as much of the roof and sides as I can ahead of time, and maybe I won't have quite as much work to do on the playa.
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Postby slvrnmph » Thu Feb 19, 2009 11:57 am

I'm planning on bringing a yurt this year and am trying to decide on what size to make. I just need to sleep 2 people, but I would also like to have space for a small kitchen area. Any suggestions on which yurt to build?
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Postby jkisha » Thu Feb 19, 2009 12:04 pm

slvrnmph wrote:I'm planning on bringing a yurt this year and am trying to decide on what size to make. I just need to sleep 2 people, but I would also like to have space for a small kitchen area. Any suggestions on which yurt to build?


Yes, definately the standard one with the 4' x 8' wall panels. You'll be glad you have the extra space.

There were only two in our yurt last year and I wouldn't have wanted it being any smaller--especially since it is comfortable enough to spend time in during the day. (I should add that we air conditioned ours).

This year we are actually going to build two and connect them--one sort of a party entertaining area, the other for sleeping.

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Postby slvrnmph » Thu Feb 19, 2009 12:11 pm

Thanks JK. My friend and I were thinking the 8', but I was wondering if I was being space greedy. Plus we like to shelter our camp mates during storms (I've brought an RV/trailer the past 4 years).
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Postby jkisha » Thu Feb 19, 2009 12:22 pm

Don't worry about space, there's plenty--especially if you are camping by yourself. There are some space concerns if you are with a theme camp.

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Postby asterflower » Wed Mar 04, 2009 2:18 pm

ok so im probably going to be making a hexayurt. my one concern though is traveling with it. i have a 4 door car but i dont know if the panels will fit on top good.

does anybody have tips or tricks on how to travel with one?
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Postby jkisha » Wed Mar 04, 2009 3:30 pm

Buy a carrier for the top of your car. (Don't remember right off what the exact name is for them.)

Then, take all the panels and stack them. They make a nice 4' x 8' x 1' stack. Then wrap them all in the tarp you will be using for the floor. Tie it all up like a big christmas present and two people will be able to easily lift it onto the car carier. Tie it securely to the car carier and you're ready to go.

JK

(just remembered: roof rack)
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Postby mojo » Wed Mar 04, 2009 3:43 pm

Look on Craig's list for a car roof rack to tie the yurt sections down to.
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Postby ConnieH » Tue Mar 24, 2009 1:58 pm

Thanks for all your wonderful info JK (and others!), I'm going to build one of these for this year's burn. We tented it last year with two very lame shade structures that we luckily took down right before the storm on Saturday hit, because they would not have survived. We will be there for an entire week this time, so a sturdy comfortable and dust-free (or less dust) structure will be awesome.

Any questions I had about construction and set up have been thoroughly answered, but I don't recall seeing anything detailed regarding takedown...I guess my questions are these: all the stuff you tape to the outside (anchors, filters, windows...), do you cut those off when you pack it up, or leave them on? JK - it sounds like you are not using the yurt you built last year, is there a reason why not? (and maybe I've misunderstood). (EDIT: I'm a dork, now I see where you want to build a taller one this year, sorry about that!) I'd love to be able to use this for at least the next few years to justify the initial investment, it sounds realistic if it's stored and handled right, am I correct?

One final question: is it dark in there when the windows are shuttered? I read that light comes in through the roof seams, is that light enough to say, read by, or is it just a dim ambient light? Would artificial lighting be necessary during the day if it's all shuttered up?

Thanks in advance :)
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Postby jkisha » Tue Mar 24, 2009 3:11 pm

ConnieH wrote:Thanks for all your wonderful info JK (and others!), I'm going to build one of these for this year's burn. We tented it last year with two very lame shade structures that we luckily took down right before the storm on Saturday hit, because they would not have survived. We will be there for an entire week this time, so a sturdy comfortable and dust-free (or less dust) structure will be awesome.

Any questions I had about construction and set up have been thoroughly answered, but I don't recall seeing anything detailed regarding takedown...I guess my questions are these: all the stuff you tape to the outside (anchors, filters, windows...), do you cut those off when you pack it up, or leave them on? JK - it sounds like you are not using the yurt you built last year, is there a reason why not? (and maybe I've misunderstood). (EDIT: I'm a dork, now I see where you want to build a taller one this year, sorry about that!) I'd love to be able to use this for at least the next few years to justify the initial investment, it sounds realistic if it's stored and handled right, am I correct?

One final question: is it dark in there when the windows are shuttered? I read that light comes in through the roof seams, is that light enough to say, read by, or is it just a dim ambient light? Would artificial lighting be necessary during the day if it's all shuttered up?

Thanks in advance :)


To disassemble, yes; just cut the tape at the folds, cut off the anchors, and basically trim everything to clean it up; but I wouldn't suggest trying to remove the tape if you want to reuse the yurt next year.

We will be using our yurt this year too, we are just going to be making some modifications. As mentioned earlier in the thread, we'll add an entire second room, which will be two feet taller. This really isn't necessary, except me being a bit older, I don't like having to bend over each time I want to go into the yurt during the day. The sleeping section will still have four foot walls. (I'm not so old that I can't bend over twice a day. :))

During the day the yurt will be illuminated pretty well through the roof seams. For the evening, we had several battery operated fluorescent lights (both one foot long and six inch long sizes) mounted in the yurt. We now have them mounted in the garage; but will probably take them again next year, unless we find something else we like better. These things suck up batteries.

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Postby mojo » Wed Mar 25, 2009 12:17 pm

JK - I am also going to build a couple of yurts for the first time this year and I am curious about how you will design your 6' walls..... are you taping a 2' piece to the bottom of the 4 x 8's? I am curious about how to do that and maintain stability. I suppose it would be simple to tape a few "ribs" between the pieces to alleviate any folding.
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Postby ConnieH » Wed Mar 25, 2009 12:58 pm

I can't speak for JK, but if I were going with taller walls, I'd tape any additions or extensions to the wall pieces vertically instead of horizontally, seems like it would be stronger that way. Although taping two 4x8s together vertically, then cutting off the top 2 feet would create a bunch of wasted 2x4 pieces. Maybe JK has a different plan.

I did see that the hexacomb cardboard is available in different lengths, so maybe the thermax stuff is, also...if you could get it in 12 foot lengths, that would be perfect to cut in half for 6 foot walls. I need to make a trip to my friendly local building supply store :)
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Postby jkisha » Wed Mar 25, 2009 6:06 pm

We're going for six foot walls, which is why we are adding the additional two feet at the bottom of the horizontal panels. This way we only need to cut three 4' x 8' pieces in half. No waste.

We toyed around with the idea of eight foot walls, but thought it would be too risky in case there were strong winds. There are others that have built yurts on the playa with eight foot walls though. The main ceiling in the center would be over 12 feet, and there are other logistical problems with getting the roof on eight foot walls too--especially if you have limited manpower and ladders.

I'm not sure which would be strongest--horizontal or vertical--or maybe even alternating them one wall horizontal and the next vertical--don't know. Maybe you can do the experimenting on this and report back.

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Postby ConnieH » Wed May 13, 2009 12:42 pm

Does anyone have any thoughts about using R-Tech insulation versus the foil coated R-Max (or similar Thermax, Tuff-R)? R-Tech is basically white styrofoam with some kind of clear plastic film coating, so it's white, not reflective like the R-Max. Seems a flimsy-er, but I can get the R-Tech $8 per panel cheaper. The white would still be somewhat reflective, right? At least it wouldn't absorb the heat like a dark color.

My other alternative is some pink stuff (can't remember the brand name) that is definitely heavier and stronger than the R-tech and price is in between R-Tech and Tuff-R, but...it's pink. Solid pink. Part of me thinks this would be really groovy on the playa, but another part of me can only think of Pepto-Bismal.

I was going to go buy the R-Tech tonight and start prepping panels and do a test build this weekend, but now I'm having second thoughts about the stuff. Are the aluminum coated panels absolutely necessary for structural stability?
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Postby jkisha » Wed May 13, 2009 1:29 pm

ConnieH wrote:Does anyone have any thoughts about using R-Tech insulation versus the foil coated R-Max (or similar Thermax, Tuff-R)? R-Tech is basically white styrofoam with some kind of clear plastic film coating, so it's white, not reflective like the R-Max. Seems a flimsy-er, but I can get the R-Tech $8 per panel cheaper. The white would still be somewhat reflective, right? At least it wouldn't absorb the heat like a dark color.

My other alternative is some pink stuff (can't remember the brand name) that is definitely heavier and stronger than the R-tech and price is in between R-Tech and Tuff-R, but...it's pink. Solid pink. Part of me thinks this would be really groovy on the playa, but another part of me can only think of Pepto-Bismal.

I was going to go buy the R-Tech tonight and start prepping panels and do a test build this weekend, but now I'm having second thoughts about the stuff. Are the aluminum coated panels absolutely necessary for structural stability?


I'm not familiar with the R-Tech product, but from our experience with the 1" foil products, I don't think you'd want anything that was any flimsier--it gets real windy out there. I don't think it's the foil as much as the regidity of the panels you need to worry about. (Oh, and that the panels are water-proof, as it rains sometimes too.)

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Postby HeironymousJosch » Wed May 13, 2009 4:17 pm

jkisha wrote:Buy a carrier for the top of your car. (Don't remember right off what the exact name is for them.)

Then, take all the panels and stack them. They make a nice 4' x 8' x 1' stack. Then wrap them all in the tarp you will be using for the floor. Tie it all up like a big christmas present and two people will be able to easily lift it onto the car carier. Tie it securely to the car carier and you're ready to go.

JK

(just remembered: roof rack)


This is a good tip. When I transferred my thermax panels home, my truck bed/topper was full of crap so I wrapped the panels up in a tarp (that will be used as the floor on the playa) and cinched it to the roof with tie downs. Two tips - lay the panels on the tarp with most of the excess on the leading edge (the end pointing toward the front of your car) and flap the excess tarp up over the front and across the top of the panels. This will prevent wind from entering between the panels. Also, a few heavy cardboard packing corners are great for transport. They are thrown away by the thousands at most shipping and receiving warehouses daily. Placing these along the sides of your bundle will allow you to cinch down more tightly without marring your expensive panels.
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Postby HeironymousJosch » Wed May 13, 2009 4:35 pm

ConnieH wrote:Does anyone have any thoughts about using R-Tech insulation versus the foil coated R-Max (or similar Thermax, Tuff-R)? R-Tech is basically white styrofoam with some kind of clear plastic film coating, so it's white, not reflective like the R-Max. Seems a flimsy-er, but I can get the R-Tech $8 per panel cheaper. The white would still be somewhat reflective, right? At least it wouldn't absorb the heat like a dark color.

My other alternative is some pink stuff (can't remember the brand name) that is definitely heavier and stronger than the R-tech and price is in between R-Tech and Tuff-R, but...it's pink. Solid pink. Part of me thinks this would be really groovy on the playa, but another part of me can only think of Pepto-Bismal.

I was going to go buy the R-Tech tonight and start prepping panels and do a test build this weekend, but now I'm having second thoughts about the stuff. Are the aluminum coated panels absolutely necessary for structural stability?


Neither of these foams are suitable for the application. They do not have the flexural strength and are lacking the insulation that makes the hexayurt perfect for the playa. That r-tech is just expanded polystyrene with a thin flexible plastic film adhered to both faces. This stuff would likely buckle under heavy winds. The pink stuff is extruded polystyrene and can be commonly found in blue as well. This stuff is a little less brittle than expanded foam but shears like a mother. I use it to make molds for fiberglass fabrication and I can score one side of a 3" piece and snap a line straight through it with little to no resistance. Furthermore, neither of these styrenes have the radiant barrier that makes all the difference in the world.

It sounds like you're researching products that your local Lowes or Home Depot carries. Unfortunately, the big box hardware stores don't carry what you need for a hexayurt anymore. With one exception, some Lowes carry a 1/2" thermax but you'd have to buy two and adhere them and at $18 a pop, it isn't worth it. You need a foil-faced polyiso(cyanurate) sheathing board or an equally rigid material like hexacomb cardboard and a radiant barrier. The polyiso is much, much more rigid than the styrenes and the foil face not only protects the foam but keeps your yurt cool on the playa. Your best bet is to google "insulation suppliers" in your neck of the woods. There's one company in the Denver Metro area, where I live, that distributes Thermax and similar products. The stuff is most commonly used in commercial standing-seam metal roofs so the direct-to-consumer outlets have dropped it. Expect to pay about $20-25 per sheet for the stuff. Don't go cheap, you don't want your playa home blowing down on ya!

I hope this is helpful.
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Postby HeironymousJosch » Wed May 13, 2009 9:40 pm

jkisha wrote:My 'guess' is that it wouldn't reduce the insulation value much, if at all, should you paint it. I just would stick to the lighter colors. I am just basing this on the way those panels are used in building--they are covered by whatever the external finish is--wood, brick, etc.

We painted a flower garden scene on the front panel of our yurt and decorated the other panels with bumper stickers.

Though there would be air space between the panels and the finish material.

You might want to go to the website of the company that makes the panels you are using and send them an email about this. I'd be curious to hear their reply too.


JK


The foil-facing absolutely makes a difference, it acts as a radiant barrier, reflecting close to 100% of the light that hits the surface of the panels. Thermax, RMAX and other panels are insulated sheathings that are rated to be left exposed. So, in most applications, they end up getting covered by another material but the intention of the design is that they don't have to be. If you paint the surface of the panels, it will diminish the reflective qualities of the yurt, absorb more heat and thus be hotter.
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Postby jkisha » Wed May 13, 2009 10:27 pm

HeironymousJosch wrote:
jkisha wrote:My 'guess' is that it wouldn't reduce the insulation value much, if at all, should you paint it. I just would stick to the lighter colors. I am just basing this on the way those panels are used in building--they are covered by whatever the external finish is--wood, brick, etc.

We painted a flower garden scene on the front panel of our yurt and decorated the other panels with bumper stickers.

Though there would be air space between the panels and the finish material.

You might want to go to the website of the company that makes the panels you are using and send them an email about this. I'd be curious to hear their reply too.


JK


The foil-facing absolutely makes a difference, it acts as a radiant barrier, reflecting close to 100% of the light that hits the surface of the panels. Thermax, RMAX and other panels are insulated sheathings that are rated to be left exposed. So, in most applications, they end up getting covered by another material but the intention of the design is that they don't have to be. If you paint the surface of the panels, it will diminish the reflective qualities of the yurt, absorb more heat and thus be hotter.


Makes sense that the reflective surface would help keep the yurt cool; but I don't understand why in the world the company would have designed them to left exposed. Other than the hexayurt, when are they ever left exposed in construction?????

The original inventor suggested that they may have to be painted if they caused neighbors at BM problems with glare, but we didn't find that to be the case.

Our yurt was pretty cool--even when we weren't running the AC.

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http://www.mudskippercafe.com
When I was a kid I used to pray every night for a new bicycle.
Then I realised that the Lord doesn't work that way so I stole one and asked Him to forgive me.
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jkisha
 
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Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2007 10:00 pm
Location: Los Angeles
Burning Since: 2007
Camp Name: Mudskipper Cafe

Postby ConnieH » Thu May 14, 2009 7:53 am

THIS IS AWESOME - Thank you SO much, this is exactly the information I needed. I have a friend at a local building supply company who can get R-Max panels for $18/each, I was just seeing if I could save a buck or eight by going with the Home Depot ones. I figured there was a reason all the yurt pics I see were the foil coated stuff, but I couldn't find the actual reason *why*.
ConnieH
 
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Location: Idaho

Postby jkisha » Thu May 14, 2009 12:40 pm

ConnieH wrote:THIS IS AWESOME - Thank you SO much, this is exactly the information I needed. I have a friend at a local building supply company who can get R-Max panels for $18/each, I was just seeing if I could save a buck or eight by going with the Home Depot ones. I figured there was a reason all the yurt pics I see were the foil coated stuff, but I couldn't find the actual reason *why*.


Home Depot also sells the R-MAX ones too--at least here in Los Angeles and for about the same price, if my memory serves. We bought our panels two years ago now.

JK
JK
Image
http://www.mudskippercafe.com
When I was a kid I used to pray every night for a new bicycle.
Then I realised that the Lord doesn't work that way so I stole one and asked Him to forgive me.
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jkisha
 
Posts: 11403
Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2007 10:00 pm
Location: Los Angeles
Burning Since: 2007
Camp Name: Mudskipper Cafe

Postby HeironymousJosch » Thu May 14, 2009 3:09 pm

jkisha wrote:Makes sense that the reflective surface would help keep the yurt cool; but I don't understand why in the world the company would have designed them to left exposed. Other than the hexayurt, when are they ever left exposed in construction?????
JK


I asked my local supplier the exact same question and he didn't have a very good answer. Beats me!
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